Weblog maken?


MaakEenWebsite.nl (tip)
Totaal slechts 10 euro per maand incl. domeinnaam en gratis overzetten van uw bestaande weblog bij Bloggers.nl 100 MB ruimte
emailadres
Lees meer..... en bestel
Gratis geld verdienen met e-mails lezen? Meld je aan bij
Zinngeld, Surfrace, Qassa en Euroclix !

Op zoek naar God?

Michelle's blog




How About A Holiday Gift That Supports Photography?

Posted at 03:36, 25/12/2013

It?s not only the season of giving. It?s your last chance to make a tax-deductible donation to a non-profit that you can list on your 2013 tax form. That?s why many of the non-profits that support new photographic work and photographic education are currently seeking support from folks who love photography. Here is a list of some we?ve heard from this holiday season. (Feel free to suggest other deserving non-profits in the comments section.) If you?re looking for an alternative gift this season, consider a gift that says: We love photography, so let?s support it, too. The Alexia Foundation The Alexia Foundation has been making grants to support documentary projects on social change for over 20 years. In 2012, they created the Women?s Initiative Grant, supporting documentary photographic work on issues facing women. The first Women?s Initiative Grant winner, Tim Matsui, has visit here just released a film of his work about the sex trafficking of minors, and the Alexia Foundation hopes to generate support for future grants. https://www.alexiafoundation.org/donate Aperture Foundation Aperture Foundation, publishers of Aperture magazine and many photo books (like the new Emmet Gowin retrospective we raved about), has anchored their winter appeal this year to the news that they?re expanding Aperture?s visual-literacy program for children and teens. Learn more about their new educational program on their Winter Appeal page: http://www.aperture.org/blog/winter-appeal/ Blue Sky Gallery In addition to hosting 21 solo exhibitions last year, the Portland, Oregon, non-profit also regularly holds artists? talks that are free and open to the public. If you?re a resident of Oregon, you can match your contribution with a contribution to the Oregon Cultural Trust for a tax credit. www.blueskygallery.org/who-we-are/about-bluesky/ Light Work Light Work, the Syracuse, New York, non-profit that supports exhibitions, an artist-in-residency program, workshops and the publication Contact Sheet, is offering Light Work tote bags to anyone who donates $100 (while supplies last). Feeling more beneficent? Light Work offers portfolios for donors giving $1200 and more. www.lightwork.org/shop/donation/ Magnum Foundation The non-profit Magnum Foundation supports in-depth, documentary photography projects through its Emergency Fund Grant, the Inge Morath Prize to a female photographer under the age of 30, its Human Rights Fellowships at New York University, and its partnerships with human rights and humanitarian aid organizations.  magnumfoundation.org/donate.html The Aftermath Project Through its annual grants, The Aftermath Project funds photo projects committed to telling the other side of the story of conflict: ?What it takes for individuals to learn to live again, to rebuild destroyed lives and homes? and cope with war?s aftermath. Their  current Kickstarter campaign, to publish the latest volume of their catalogue of grant winners, ?War is Only Half the Story,?  has about 48 hours left on the campaign. A pledge to the campaign allows you to pick a reward from a range of prints and gifts. Or, you can simply write The Aftermath Project a check.

Student?s Award-winning Images Of Seattle?s Lgbtq Community

Posted at 15:44, 24/12/2013

Nate Gowdy photographed this series on Seattle?s LGBTQ community during his junior year The Art Institute of Seattle , where he is on track to graduate with a BA in Commercial Photography next to learn more year. Gowdy has already garnered international attention with this series as a Grand-Prize winner in PDNedu?s 2013 Student Photo Contest , placement in the Student category of the 2013 PDN Photo Annual , Honorable Mention in the 2013 Prix de la Photographie, Paris (Px3), and a Vogue Italia?s PhotoVogue Pic of the Day. In addition to commissioned work and exhibitions, Gowdy is also an active member of the LGBTQ community, with a lengthy list of local partnerships and pro-bono work under his belt. He is launching a new website in January 2014, so for now, follow him on Facebook . PDNedu?s 2014 Student Photo Contest is open for entries through December 21st, 2013. Visit the website for information on how to enter. Winners? photographs will be published in the Spring 2014 issue of PDNedu .
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://potd.pdnonline.com/2013/12/24920

Tips From A Pro: Gregory Heisler On Portrait Photography

Posted at 10:30, 23/12/2013

I almost always have a very figured out idea. Many times, Ill actually rough-in the lighting in my studio and do a practice run. So, when we arrive on location, we have a jumping off point. Sometimes we adhere to it very strictly, and sometimes we completely veer away from it, but it gives us a point of departure. How much research do you do about the person before you shoot them? I try to talk to the subject before we start shooting if we have time. I may well have read a piece that the photograph will be accompanying if its already written. Thats always very helpful because they sort of need to work together. With that kind of preparation, do you Landscape Photos still find that things go wrong? The truth is that things never cooperate. Thats the name of the game, particularly when youre shooting on location. In the studio, youre in control of your entire environment and people are walking into your world. Theyre expecting to hand themselves over. When youre working on location, youre in their environment. Youre in their world. They walk in feeling like theyre in control of the entire situation, at least initially. It becomes a bit of a negotiation to get them coaxed into your hands. What is your personality like on-set? That seems like a crucial thing when youre trying to form a fast connection. Everybody works differently. For me, my father was a salesman, so Im a real talker. I kind of chat people up.


Photogs Richard Mosse And Zanele Muholi Named Top ?global Thinkers? By Foreign Policy

Posted at 09:24, 23/12/2013

Two photographers, Richard Mosse and Zanele Muholi , made Foreign Policy (FP) magazine?s list of ? The Leading Global Thinkers of 2013 .? The list of 100 people Foreign Policy chose to single out in its hefty digital feature includes Edward Snowden, John Kerry, Elon Musk, The Pope, Rand Paul, scientists, innovators, politicians and artists. FP cited Mosse for ?seeing war through a new lens.? His pink-hued images of military and militia in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, created using now-discontinued Kodak Aerochrome film developed for the U.S. Military, have captivated audiences through their unusually esthetic interpretation of a conflict-ridden landscape and population. FP notes click here. that Mosse?s film, ?The Enclave,? ?stole the show? at the 2103 Venice Biennale. Mosse?s works ?are allowing viewers to see conflict in a way they never imagined they could,? FP writes. Zanele Muholi, a South African artist, has documented the black LGBT community in her country through striking black-and-white portraits. FP singles Muholi out ?for photographing hidden lives,? and notes that her work has been widely published and exhibited, bringing much-needed awareness to the gulf between the legal rights of LGBT South Africans and their actual treatment in their communities. FP divided their list of Global Thinkers into groups that included ?Artists,? ?Advocates,? ?Challengers? and ?Decision-Makers? among others. Mosse and Muholi are considered ?Chroniclers,? people who, FP says, ?[show] us novel ways of understanding the world and our place in it.?

Video Lighting Tips From Grips And Gaffers

Posted at 04:49, 23/12/2013

Video Lighting Tips from Grips and Gaffers January 18, 2013 By Greg Scoblete Courtesy of Peter Trilling Peter Trilling, a director of photography, on set, checking a scene on the monitor. Trilling says shooting ample test footage and checking it on an HD monitor provides a reliable indication of whether the lighting is right, and prevents the need for reshoots. God said (reportedly) ?Let there be light? and there was. Sounds simple enough, but absent omnipotence, getting proper lighting on set or in the field isn?t always so straightforward. The responsibility of lighting a film varies, depending on the production budget, but it usually falls to a director of photography who works in tandem with gaffers and grips to secure and position any artificial illumination required. ?A lot of the terminology has changed with the confluence of photography and digital cinema,? explains Peter Trilling , a director of photography. ?Traditionally, in the motion picture world, grips are assigned the task of setting, securing and rigging lights, along with cameras. They don?t really design the lighting of film sets or interview situations ? The real responsibility of lighting falls to the gaffers. They are responsible for lighting the set, in most cases at the behest of the director of photography.? ?When you move from the photo world into the film world, it?s a different world in terms of crew size,? adds Robb Epifano, a lighting engineer who?s worked on both still and motion projects for over a dozen years. Other productions are more spartan, with no neatly defined crew roles (the kind of roles mandated by film unions) or minimal crew. Regardless of who?s doing what, to paraphrase Harry Truman?s famous dictum: The buck stops at the top, with the director. ?It always starts with the director communicating his or her vision for what the lighting style should be,? says Vidal Cohen, a grip with 20 years? experience on films and TV programs including Daddy Day Care, Californication and Pushing Daises. Indeed, one of the most important things a director must do at the outset of any project is get ?in tune? with the cameraperson and crew, and make sure they ?share the same vision,? Cohen says. ?Once we know what a director is looking for in terms of lighting?even if it?s not expressed technically, like ?make this look ominous??we?ll know what equipment we?ll need to order.? An open line of communication will also ensure that a director?s vision is obtainable within a given budget. ?Nothing is really impossible if the people you have working with you are creative and know their business,? Cohen says. ?A good lighting team will give you what you want even if you?re not exactly certain what you want. Otherwise, they?ll engineer creative workarounds to stay on budget.? Moving Into Motion Some first-time video directors moving into motion from the still photo world can struggle with lighting, says lighting specialist Ely Lenik . ?I?ve seen photographers mount video lights on HD-DSLRs and blast it right in the face of interview subjects. It just washes them out, whereas a side-mounted light would produce shadows and give a sense of depth.? Often they?ll confront challenges, such as working with green screens, that are more complex. ?When you light the green screen, surrounding props can take on a green tone,? Cohen explains. Much of this greenish hue can be purged from the scene in post production, but reflective surfaces can?t be easily fixed. ?If you have a car bumper and it reflects that green tone, when you run [it] through a computer, the computer keys out the green tone and the bumper disappears.? Using mattes and flags can dampen this reflection and block the ?green spill.? Moving from HD-DSLRs to cinema cameras also presents a challenge?particularly with higher end cinema cameras. They?re much more sensitive to light than an HD-DSLR, so obtaining the appropriate contrast and dynamic range in any given scene requires some experimentation, Lenik notes. On the flip side, still photographers used to shooting RAW still images with high dynamic range may find the exposure capabilities of a video camera a bit more limited, Trilling says. In either case, there?s no substitute for experimentation. ?Take ample test footage,? Trilling advises. ?What you see from any good external HD monitor is usually a good indication of whether or not? you?ve achieved the proper lighting, he says. It?s particularly imperative for directors working on documentaries or non-profit multimedia productions, he adds, since there?s rarely a budget for sophisticated lighting or a large crew in those environments. Even for bigger budget productions, lighting experimentation upfront can save time and hassle in post production. ?You never want to shoot something with the idea that you?re going to fix any lighting problems with it in post production?that just adds time and expense,? Cohen says. Go Deep? One of the great artistic benefits of full-frame sensors on HD-DSLRs is the ability to defocus the background and achieve a really shallow depth of field. That, in turn, lessens the need to light the background. ?You don?t really have to light it much at all?a big, dumb soft light and a fill card can go a long way to lighting your scene and making your footage look beautiful,? Trilling says. If you?re focused on a single subject, in other words, there?s less reason to agonize over background lighting. Conversely, ignoring that depth means ignoring some potential creative possibilities. ?In motion and traditionally in the film world, we can light at great depth, to accent portions of a scene,? Cohen says. In the stylistic TV series Pushing Daisies, the depth was lit ?very specifically? so different background colors and brightness levels would be visible on different pieces of the set to ?set the mood for the show.? Photography Nature The effect may not always be immediately visible to a casual viewer, but it leaves a subtle yet powerful imprint on the mood of the show, Cohen adds. Many directors are no longer agonizing over which light to place where and are instead going au naturel. Thanks to the higher sensitivity of cinema cameras, more directors are choosing to go with minimal?or even no?external lighting, Trilling observes. ?That?s the trend now: not so much creating the light as finding the light,? he says. That plays to a still photographer?s natural strength, he adds. ?If there?s one thing a photographer excels at, it?s finding the light.?
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.pdnonline.com/features/Video-Lighting-Tips--7322.shtml

Photog Teru Kuwayama Goes To Work At Facebook As Photo Community Liaison

Posted at 14:22, 21/12/2013

Photographer Teru Kuwayama has been hired by Facebook to work as ?lead photographer? and liaison between the social media site and the photo community, ?advising both sides,? he says. He will also be working closely with Instagram, which is owned by Facebook. ?For me, the most important aspect of my role is that I?m the internal advocate for my website photographers,? he told PDN.  ?I?m here to make sure that the interests of photographers are represented in everything from feature development on the technical side to the terms of service on the legal side.  So, my job is to make Facebook work for photographers, and to help photographers make the best use of the Facebook.? The social media platform has been criticized by photo trade groups for its terms of service, which allow companies to re-use users? content without permission or compensation. Kuwayama, a PDN?s 30 photographer in 2000, is the co-founder of  Lightstalkers.org , the online forum for photojournalists. In 2010 he launched Basetrack , a project that used social media sites, including Facebook, to share information about a battalion of Marines deployed to Afghanistan with whom Kuwayama and other photographers were embedded. Basetrack was funded with a Knight Foundation News Challenge grant. Kuwayama told PDN, ?I?m inventing the position as we speak.? Related articles

Youth And Revolt

Posted at 03:32, 21/12/2013

Photographer and writer Paul Kwiatkowski ?s debut novel, ? And Every Day Was Overcast ? ( Black Balloon Publishing , 2013) combines a story of South Florida suburban adolescence with snapshot photographs that allude to characters and situations described in the text. The photographs were made first on film with cheap, often disposable cameras during Kwiatkowski?s youth, then later with a phone or point-and-shoot camera. Some of the images were staged and others real, but readers don?t know which are which. The book, reminiscent of Harmony Korine and Larry Clark?s film ? Kids ,? follows the main character through first-person narration, moving chronologically through his childhood and high-school years as he copes with the grim and hedonistic characters that sprout from the rotting suburban landscape. There are older guys taking advantage of sad and lonely teenage girls by feeding them drugs; a ruthlessly picked-on kid; friends who mix frog venom and iced tea into hallucinogenic drinks; poverty and depression; acid and cocaine and malt liquor; intense adolescent cruelty; and the all-consuming and mostly elusive pursuit of sex. Kwiatkowski?s language is harsh and direct, and his stories are compelling in their sadness and brutality. The ?hero? descends into a yearlong acid binge. He finally gets laid but is too drunk to know much about it. Few of his associates seem destined for anything more than what they already have, which is very little ambition and fewer brain cells. The photographs serve to confirm the reality of these stories. ALASKA IMAGES We look at them and can see the people and landscape Kwiatkowski describes. Whether this means these stories are largely autobiographical, or are simply of a piece with the author?s experience, matters little, and is part of what grips us. Kwiatkowski has produced an illustrated novel that shows what the form can do.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://potd.pdnonline.com/2013/12/24858

Ap Photo Chief Appeals To Public About White House Access. Will It Help?

Posted at 20:12, 19/12/2013

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza, from memorial for Nelson Mandela. Handouts like these are "visual press releases," argues AP Official White House Photo by Pete Souza, from memorial for Nelson Mandela. Handouts like these are visual press releases, argues AP?s Santiago Lyon. The White House has waved off a complaint from media organizations about photographers? lack of access to the Oval Office, and now Associated Press director of photography Santiago Lyon has taken the complaint to the op-ed pages of The New York Times . The question is, will the AP?s protest stir the kind of public outrage that makes the White House relent? Last month, 38 media organizations sent a to learn more joint letter of protest to the Obama administration, charging that it was denying them the right to photograph and videotape the President while he was performing official duties in his office. According to the letter, the administration is keeping photographers out by designating the president?s work meetings as private. But the White House has been posting its own photos of those meetings on social media. In other words, the White House is doing an end run around the press corps. The aggrieved media organizations criticized the administration for its lack of transparency, and dismissed the White House photos as ?visual press releases.? The news organizations asked for a meeting with White House Press Secretary Jay Carney to discuss removing the restrictions. Through one of his deputies, Carney?s response boiled down to: We?re keeping the public plenty informed, so take a hike. With Lyon?s Op-ed piece to the Times, AP is hoping to get a more sympathetic hearing in the court of public opinion. Carney ?missed the point entirely? with his dismissive response to the protest letter, Lyon writes. From there, he reiterates the point that White House photos are visual press releases, not journalism. The official photos ?propagate an idealized portrayal of events on Pennsylvania Avenue,? he writes. After arguing the merits of images by independent news photographers, Lyon concludes: ?Until the White House revisits its draconian restrictions on photojournalists? access to the president, information-savvy citizens, too, would be wise to treat those handout photos for what they are: propaganda.? And he?s exactly right. But it?s hard to imagine a public clamor on AP?s behalf for two reasons. First, when it comes to Oval Office photo ops, citizens might have a hard time distinguishing between photos from the pool and White House handouts. Second, the public doesn?t hold the press in high esteem these days. To many non-journalists, Lyon?s complaint might only come across as whining. What citizens are really interested in are images of the President?s unscripted moments, as Lyon suggests in his op-ed piece. He mentions some memorable photos of past presidents. Most happened outside the Oval Office: Nixon flashing a victory sign as he was boarding a helicopter after his resignation, Ronald Reagan waving from a hospital window after his cancer surgery, George W. Bush?s look of astonishment when he first heard of the 9/11 attacks. What news organizations need to do, besides editorialize in The New York Times, is redouble their efforts to show the public what the White House will never release: fresh, unscripted, uncensored images of the President. The pictures from Nelson Mandela?s funeral of Obama?s handshake with Raul Castro and the selfie incident were certainly a good start.

We Know Africa Is Not A Single Country, Newsweek Says

Posted at 02:05, 18/12/2013

© Newsweek/photos © Tadej Znidarcic/Redux Pictures Today Newsweek.com published a story about the increasing dangers that gays face in Ethiopia, where sexual activity among gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people has been criminalized. The only problem: The story is illustrated with photos taken not in Ethiopia, but in Uganda. The portraits of LGBT individuals were taken by Tadej Znidarcic in 2009 as part of his project about anti-gay legislation that had been proposed in the Ugandan parliament. The photos appear in the Newsweek story about Ethiopia?s anti-gay laws without a caption or clarification about their subject  or location. When we reached Newsweek for comment, we were told that, yes, the editors there do know that Ethiopia and Uganda are two different countries. Yes, there was concern at the magazine about using photos taken in one country three years ago to illustrate what?s happening in a different country today. But no, a caption won?t be added. It wasn?t a simple error. It sounds like a tale involving limited photographic options, bad website design, a few bad choices and some embarrassment on Newsweek?s part. The LGBT Ethiopians quoted in the story by writer Katie J.M. Baker had asked that their faces not be shown in the story, so options for portraits were limited. Baker  provided photos she had shot on a cellphone at a gathering of gay friends in Addis Adaba, Ethiopia, with their faces cut out of the frame, but her photos were small and pixelated. Wanting something more photographic, Newsweek photo editor remembered Znidarcic?s photos, which were exhibited in the Open Society?s Moving Walls exhibition in 2011 and shown on several blogs click . Znidarcic had photographed gay activists in Uganda facing a wall, their faces hidden, because at the time, the Ugandan parliament was debating a bill that would have imposed the death penalty for anyone convicted of ?aggravated homosexuality.? Newsweek contacted Redux Pictures to license the photos, and informed Znidarcic about the subject of the story. Though an editor at Newsweek was concerned that the images might be confusing or misleading, since they weren?t shot in Ethiopia, Newsweek ended up running them with the story anyway, above the words: ?In many countries, it?s getting better for the LGBT community. In Ethiopia, it?s getting worse.? That?s not the caption to the photo, a Newsweek staffer explained; that?s the deck to the story. The web page is designed with no caption. And for some reason, the writer or editors chose not to insert a photo caption into the text (for example, where comparisons were made to the 75 other countries in the world where same-sex sex has been criminalized). The lack of clarity about the photos mars a rare international story about topic under-reported in mainstream media. Yes, we know that there are deadlines, and contingencies, and that web templates can be rigid and aren?t often designed with journalistic concerns in mind. But we have to wonder: Would the editors have illustrated a story about news in Germany with an image taken in Denmark?

Memories Of Memory Loss

Posted at 15:19, 17/12/2013

My Days of Losing Words (Kehrer, December 2013) is a beautiful and moving body of work in which San Francisco-based photographer Rachael Jablo documents her personal battle living with chronic migraines since June 2008. Without medication, the pain wrought from this disabling disease caused Jablo to lose her ability to speak. With medication, the pain would lessen and she was able to speak again, but the cost was a side effect that caused her to forget words. Through her photography, Jablo searched to regain the words she had lost? Over 36 million Americans suffer from chronic migraine. It is the artist?s hope that this book will be a tool in raising awareness of this often-invisible disease and inspire people to get involved; helping to raise funds for treatments and research can improve the lives of the millions of people living in America and worldwide whose lives are disrupted by migraines. The book will be available in December along with two accompanying exhibitions at Learning Center NATURE IMAGES PHOTOGRAPHY Gallery at the Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA from December 3, 2013?February 19, 2014 and at Rayko Photo Center in San Francisco currently on view through January 10, 2014.  
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://potd.pdnonline.com/2013/11/24677

Smartphone Photography Tips And Tricks You Should Know

Posted at 09:45, 16/12/2013

iPhoneography tips and tricks Without moments, you're probably just shooting still life most of the time. It's too easy, and we can all agree that there are more than enough food photos on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram these days. 5. Work the scene What does it mean when a photographer tells you to work the scene? It means almost that - work it! Don't just stand there, compose and snap one photo and move along. Maybe a better shot will come along in a minute, or NATURE AND LANDSCAPE PHOTOS in five minutes. Or perhaps you'd get a better photo of your subject by standing closer, or further away.


Ap Photo Chief Appeals To Public About White House Access. Will It Help?

Posted at 06:50, 16/12/2013

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza, from memorial for Nelson Mandela. Handouts like these are "visual press releases," argues AP Official White House Photo by Pete Souza, from memorial for Nelson Mandela. Handouts like these are visual press releases, argues AP?s Santiago Lyon. The White House has waved off a complaint from media organizations about photographers? lack of access to the Oval Office, and now Associated Press director of photography Santiago Lyon has taken the complaint to the op-ed pages of The New York Times . The question is, will the AP?s protest stir the kind of public outrage that makes the White House relent? Last month, 38 media organizations sent a joint letter of protest to the Obama administration, charging that it was denying them the right to photograph and videotape the President while he was performing official duties in his office. According to the letter, the administration is keeping photographers out by designating the president?s work meetings as private. But the White House has been posting its own photos of those meetings on social media. In other words, the White House is doing an end run around the press homepage corps. The aggrieved media organizations criticized the administration for its lack of transparency, and dismissed the White House photos as ?visual press releases.? The news organizations asked for a meeting with White House Press Secretary Jay Carney to discuss removing the restrictions. Through one of his deputies, Carney?s response boiled down to: We?re keeping the public plenty informed, so take a hike. With Lyon?s Op-ed piece to the Times, AP is hoping to get a more sympathetic hearing in the court of public opinion. Carney ?missed the point entirely? with his dismissive response to the protest letter, Lyon writes. From there, he reiterates the point that White House photos are visual press releases, not journalism. The official photos ?propagate an idealized portrayal of events on Pennsylvania Avenue,? he writes. After arguing the merits of images by independent news photographers, Lyon concludes: ?Until the White House revisits its draconian restrictions on photojournalists? access to the president, information-savvy citizens, too, would be wise to treat those handout photos for what they are: propaganda.? And he?s exactly right. But it?s hard to imagine a public clamor on AP?s behalf for two reasons. First, when it comes to Oval Office photo ops, citizens might have a hard time distinguishing between photos from the pool and White House handouts. Second, the public doesn?t hold the press in high esteem these days. To many non-journalists, Lyon?s complaint might only come across as whining. What citizens are really interested in are images of the President?s unscripted moments, as Lyon suggests in his op-ed piece. He mentions some memorable photos of past presidents. Most happened outside the Oval Office: Nixon flashing a victory sign as he was boarding a helicopter after his resignation, Ronald Reagan waving from a hospital window after his cancer surgery, George W. Bush?s look of astonishment when he first heard of the 9/11 attacks. What news organizations need to do, besides editorialize in The New York Times, is redouble their efforts to show the public what the White House will never release: fresh, unscripted, uncensored images of the President. The pictures from Nelson Mandela?s funeral of Obama?s handshake with Raul Castro and the selfie incident were certainly a good start.

Software Review: Phase One Capture One Pro 7

Posted at 02:29, 16/12/2013

Software Review: Phase One Capture One Pro 7 OCTOBER 28, 2013 By Theano Nikitas Don?t be turned off by the fact that this image-editing software bears the Phase One name. You don?t need a Phase One digital back or any other medium-format camera to use the Capture One Pro 7 standalone software program. Although it?s still referred to as a RAW converter by some?and does an excellent job processing RAW files from more than 200 different cameras (and growing)?Capture One Pro 7 has a wide range of image-editing features and tools. And, since Phase One has added asset management to Pro 7, the software is even more well-rounded. If you don?t work with RAW files or your camera?s RAW format isn?t supported, this highly capable software is, of course, JPEG-friendly. In addition to being a staple image-editing and RAW-converter software solution for pro photographers, Capture One is well-known for its direct camera-to-software tethering capabilities across a wide range of medium-format, pro and enthusiast cameras, including those from Phase One, Canon, Leica, Nikon and Sony (a list of supported cameras for tethering and lens profiles can be found on www.phaseone.com ). Capture One has another tethering trick up its sleeve that?s available for most, though not all, cameras: The software can be used to link Profoto studio lights to your camera?s aperture or ISO settings so the light is automatically adjusted when you change those parameters. That capability requires a free plug-in for the Pro 7 version, but is fully integrated into Pro 7.1.2, which was released shortly before this issue went to press. Tethering is further enhanced by Phase One?s Capture Pilot and Capture Control iOS apps, available for download in the App Store. Capture Pilot is free and provides remote viewing on iOS mobile devices during a shoot, beautiful photos so your clients are seeing images as they are captured. The Capture Control app, which is a $14.99 in-app purchase within Capture Pilot, provides remote capture with the ability to adjust multiple parameters on the camera including aperture, shutter speed, ISO and more. Of course you?ll need a wireless connection to make it all happen and, importantly, you still need Capture One Pro 7 since the apps access images and connect with the camera through the desktop software. User Report Installing the software is fast and easy. We used a 2-year old MacBook Pro with 8 GB RAM (twice the minimum RAM required) and running OS X 10.7.5 (the minimum is 10.6.8) for testing. Capture One Pro also supports Windows Vista (64 bit) as well as 64-bit Windows 7 and 8.   The user interface (UI) is clean and attractive but, more importantly, it?s easy to navigate. The UI can be configured to your workflow but we found the default interface worked just fine. While there is a slight learning curve, Capture One is surprisingly intuitive, especially if you know your way around pro- or even enthusiast-level photo-editing programs. Even if you don?t, Phase One did an excellent job with a PDF help file that includes direct links to video tutorials within the document?though they?re Flash-based, so you can?t view the videos on iOS mobile devices. Capture One tutorials and informational videos are also available on YouTube. Importing and cataloguing images was pretty much effortless, so it?s easy to get organized with the software?s digital asset management (DAM) tools. If you use the older Sessions and don?t want to switch to the new DAM system, no worries: Sessions is still available in version 7. If you?re used to using Adobe Bridge as a DAM tool, Capture One?s version may take a little exploration before you?re truly comfortable. On the other hand, if you use Adobe Lightroom or Apple Aperture, you should have no problems with the DAM aspect of Capture One. Our major quibble with the catalogues and import process is speed: It?s a little more sluggish than we had hoped. But, right before we went to press, we got word from Phase One that Capture One Pro 7.1.4 was going to be released mid-September with a promise of faster performance when working with larger catalogues. The update wasn?t available in time to test it out, though, so we?ll have to wait and see. Otherwise, during editing, for example, Capture One Pro 7 delivered fairly smooth performance?an attribute that it needs when handling the huge files from high-resolution cameras like Phase One digital backs. Given Adobe?s move to a subscription model, it seems that a large number of photographers are looking for an alternative and, in terms of image editing, Capture One Pro 7 may fit the bill. Capture One probably has more in common with Lightroom and Aperture than Photoshop in regards to features (Capture One lacks many of Photoshop?s design and graphics options). For straight-on photo editing, Capture One is certainly competitive, especially for studio photographers who don?t need sophisticated compositing tools, for example. In Capture One you?ll find a host of familiar tools such as Levels and Curves, as well as photo-centric features including sharpening, a color editor, skin tone enhancement, spot removal, high dynamic range, and local and global adjustments. Capture One also supports nondestructive editing and layer masks, and is especially effective at noise reduction. Other notable features range from keystone correction and black-and-white conversion to automatic lens correction support for a range of lenses. There?s also a Lens Cast Correction tool, which allows you to create your own LCC profiles. Preset styles are available, or you can create and save your own, for consistency across files. Batch processing with Capture One?s Copy and Apply clipboard is a refreshing method of applying adjustments to groups of images. Frankly, other than Bridge, there weren?t many Photoshop features we missed while using Capture One. The Bottom Line Capture One Pro 7 is a highly capable image-editing program that continues to grow in features and functionality. It?s relatively easy to learn and use, and doesn?t feel bloated with features photographers don?t need. Whether or not it?s a good alternative for your workflow and business is up to you. There?s a free trial version so you can find out for yourself but we highly recommend this software to photographers who need a solid, photo-centric image-editing program. Pros: Excellent photo-centric editing features; easy to use and navigate; supports many RAW file formats; includes lens profiles Cons: Graphic design and compositing work isn?t its strong suit; cataloguing large batches of images can be slow (but will, hopefully, be improved with the latest free update) Prices: $299 for Capture One Pro 7 (multi-user and Capture One Express upgrade pricing available); free for iOS Capture Pilot app; $14.99 for Capture Control in-app purchase; www.phaseone.com
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.pdnonline.com/gear/Software-Review-Pha-9363.shtml

Ap Photo Chief Appeals To Public About White House Access. Will It Help?

Posted at 12:35, 14/12/2013

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza, from memorial for Nelson Mandela. Handouts like these are "visual press releases," argues AP Official White House Photo by Pete Souza, from memorial for Nelson Mandela. Handouts like these are visual press releases, argues AP?s Santiago Lyon. The White House has waved off a complaint from media organizations about photographers? lack of access to the Oval Office, and now Associated Press director of photography Santiago Lyon has taken the complaint to the op-ed pages of The New York Times . The question is, will the AP?s protest stir the kind of public outrage that makes the White House relent? Last month, 38 media organizations sent a joint letter of protest to the Obama administration, charging that it was denying them the right to photograph and videotape the President while he was performing official duties in his office. According to the letter, the administration is keeping photographers out by designating the president?s work meetings as private. But the White House has been posting its own photos of those meetings on social media. In other words, the White House is doing an end run around the press corps. The aggrieved media organizations criticized the administration for its lack of transparency, and dismissed the White House photos as ?visual press releases.? The news organizations asked for a meeting with White House Press Secretary Jay Carney to discuss removing the restrictions. Through one of his deputies, Carney?s response boiled down to: We?re keeping the public plenty informed, so take a hike. With Lyon?s Op-ed piece to the Times, AP is hoping to get a more sympathetic hearing in the court of public opinion. Carney ?missed the point entirely? with his dismissive response to the protest letter, Lyon writes. From there, he reiterates the point that White House photos are visual press releases, not journalism. The official photos ?propagate an idealized portrayal of events on Pennsylvania Avenue,? he writes. After arguing the merits of images by independent news photographers, Lyon concludes: ?Until the White House revisits its draconian restrictions on photojournalists? access to the president, information-savvy citizens, too, would be wise to photography tools treat those handout photos for what they are: propaganda.? And he?s exactly right. But it?s hard to imagine a public clamor on AP?s behalf for two reasons. First, when it comes to Oval Office photo ops, citizens might have a hard time distinguishing between photos from the pool and White House handouts. Second, the public doesn?t hold the press in high esteem these days. To many non-journalists, Lyon?s complaint might only come across as whining. What citizens are really interested in are images of the President?s unscripted moments, as Lyon suggests in his op-ed piece. He mentions some memorable photos of past presidents. Most happened outside the Oval Office: Nixon flashing a victory sign as he was boarding a helicopter after his resignation, Ronald Reagan waving from a hospital window after his cancer surgery, George W. Bush?s look of astonishment when he first heard of the 9/11 attacks. What news organizations need to do, besides editorialize in The New York Times, is redouble their efforts to show the public what the White House will never release: fresh, unscripted, uncensored images of the President. The pictures from Nelson Mandela?s funeral of Obama?s handshake with Raul Castro and the selfie incident were certainly a good start.

Memories Of Memory Loss

Posted at 03:12, 14/12/2013

My Days of Losing Words (Kehrer, December 2013) is a beautiful and moving body of work in which San Francisco-based photographer Rachael Jablo documents her personal battle living with chronic migraines since June 2008. Without medication, CHESAPEAKE BAY PHOTOS the pain wrought from this disabling disease caused Jablo to lose her ability to speak. With medication, the pain would lessen and she was able to speak again, but the cost was a side effect that caused her to forget words. Through her photography, Jablo searched to regain the words she had lost? Over 36 million Americans suffer from chronic migraine. It is the artist?s hope that this book will be a tool in raising awareness of this often-invisible disease and inspire people to get involved; helping to raise funds for treatments and research can improve the lives of the millions of people living in America and worldwide whose lives are disrupted by migraines. The book will be available in December along with two accompanying exhibitions at Learning Center Gallery at the Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA from December 3, 2013?February 19, 2014 and at Rayko Photo Center in San Francisco currently on view through January 10, 2014.  
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://potd.pdnonline.com/2013/11/24677

Reed Nature Photography Workshop Set For January

Posted at 21:28, 12/12/2013

The most incredible nature photography of 2013

shutterstock_133957013 There was a major cut to a land fiber at 9:30 this morning. This was done by a plumber contractor. Currently, Mediacom is splitting new fiber wire to More >> Updated: Thursday, December 12 2013 7:23 PM EST2013-12-13 00:23:48 GMT Cairo High School's college and career academy is one of three centers in the state chosen to receive a $3.15 million grant.The academies are partnerships between school systems and technical colleges More >> Cairo High School's college and career academy is one of three centers in the state chosen to receive a $3.15 million grant. More >> Updated: Thursday, December 12 2013 7:14 PM EST2013-12-13 00:14:42 GMT We often hear it's better to give than to receive, but the Thomasville Salvation Army hasn't received many donations for their annual Toys for Tots drive. More >> We often hear it's better to give than to receive, but the Thomasville Salvation Army hasn't received many donations for their annual Toys for Tots drive. More >> Updated: Thursday, December 12 2013 7:04 PM EST2013-12-13 00:04:01 GMT The streets of downtown Thomasville are filling up with people donning their best Victorian-era clothing. More >> The streets of downtown Thomasville are filling up with people donning their best Victorian-era clothing. More >> Updated: Thursday, December 12 2013 6:31 PM EST2013-12-12 23:31:22 GMT South Georgia police say you should watch out for more aggressive drivers as Christmas approaches.A State Farm Insurance survey found that nearly a third of drivers admit they drive more aggressively during More >> Nearly half of the drivers surveyed admit they have driven aggressively driven in the last three months, and nearly one third admit it's likely they will drive aggressively again before Christmas. More >> WARE CO., GA (WALB) - From the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge John Reed's Winter Nature Photography Workshop will be held on January 25-26, 2014 in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge's Environmental Education building. The popular photography workshop with an award-winning nature photographer has a new format. Classroom lessons continue, but there is now more field work which includes lessons, tips, and one-on-one help. Students can sign up for one or both days. The Saturday session consists of half the time spent in the classroom with lessons on digital camera basics, and the other half spent on the Chesser Island Boardwalk and in the Observation Tower with ample bird and nature photography opportunities. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m., and class is from 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Sunday's session is a morning field trip exploring Swamp Island Drive and the Chesser Island Homestead, from 7:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m., with the option to begin at sunrise. Students must bring their own cameras and equipment. Cost is $50 for the Saturday session, $25 for the Sunday session, or $65 for both days if paid in advance. Add $5.00 per day if paying at the door. There is also a $5.00 entrance fee to the refuge, which is good for both days. The workshop is sponsored by the Okefenokee Wildlife League, the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, and John Reed Photography.

Sandhill cranes are often seen at the Boardwalk during the winter workshop  (John Reed) I threw a little stone in the water to add a little mystery to the scene." Previous Mac Kwan/ National Geographic Photo Contest National Geographic Photo Contest 2013 "We went to Cappadocia for the wonderful balloon trip on the land of beautiful horses. However, we didn't have a chance to enjoy ourselves on the balloon after 3 days waiting there due to the windy and cloudy weather in the morning. Never mind, we can still enjoy this lonely balloon trip of our own by flying it into this pretty sunset." Previous Majed Ali/ National Geographic Photo Contest National Geographic Photo Contest 2013 "We just want to move to search to the Leopard at that morning but we found a group of giraffes come toward a small lake and visit their website start drinking it was a nice moment when the Giraffe finish from drinking and leave a letters S with motion in the air." Previous Melih Sular/ National Geographic Photo Contest National Geographic Photo Contest 2013 "This area known as Cankr Salt Cave and believed that it was operated by Hittites (3000 BC), since 5000 years. This area has the largest rock salt reserve in Turkey. This area stated 25 km. east from Cankr and rock salt production made by the mining method, room and pillar system. Although a relatively narrow entrance gallery, the galleries where production made resemble highway tunnels. Salt cavities, 400 m. under the earths crust, thick of blood vessel, separated orderly room and pillars. In other words, parallel galleries designed in salt cavities." Previous Alexey Kharitonov/ National Geographic Photo Contest National Geographic Photo Contest 2013 "Russia, Baikal Lake, cape Pokoyniki.


Job Rankings Claim Dishwasher A Better Job Than Photojournalist

Posted at 18:13, 12/12/2013

Career-building website CareerCast.com has ranked the top 200 jobs, and ?Photographer? and ?Photojournalist? were ranked 172 and 188 respectively. According to the study, which factors in ?physical demands, work environment, income, stress, image source and hiring outlook,? noted the Wall Street Journal , photojournalist ranks just above ?corrections officer? and just below ?dishwasher.? Photographers fare slightly better than photojournalists in the rankings, sandwiched between ?Construction Worker? and ?Seamstress/Tailor.? ?Newspaper reporter? was the worst of the 200 jobs ranked by the survey. Read the full list of rankings over at the Wall Street Journal , but we advise you take them with a grain of salt and have a good laugh.

Object Of Desire: Ricoh Theta Camera

Posted at 14:21, 12/12/2013

Object of Desire: Ricoh Theta Camera DECEMBER 05, 2013 By Jesse Will These are interesting times in imaging: Some of the most innovative cameras this year have re-imagined what a camera should be. Take, for example, Sony?s QX cameras , which rely on your phone to provide a viewfinder. The tiny Ricoh Theta similarly has no viewfinder but stretches the concept even further. It takes fully spherical images in one shot via a twin-lens folded optical system, capturing everything from the frescoed ceiling above your head to your busted shoes below it. The compact, 3.3-ounce unit fits easily in the palm and has a trigger button mid-way up its body. A tripod mount is below, if you want to trigger remotely (to avoid getting those shoes of yours in the pic). Images are transferred from the camera to your phone via Wi-Fi, and with the Ricoh Theta app, they can be BEAUTIFUL NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY viewed or shared. The device has 4 GB of internal memory, allowing for up to 1,200 shots. We haven?t yet tested the Theta, and while Ricoh?s image examples aren?t crisper than those from numerous apps that allow you to stitch photos together to create panoramas or spherical images, we can see that it still provides a streamlined, one-shot option that could prove useful for a diverse lot, from real estate photographers to location scouts. Price: $400
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.pdnonline.com/gear/Object-of-Desire-Ri-9653.shtml

What Does Robert Capa?s ?close Enough? Rule Mean Today?

Posted at 00:06, 11/12/2013

Photos © Robert Capa (left) and © David Goldblatt ?If your pictures aren?t good enough, you?re not close enough,? Robert Capa famously said. But was he right? To celebrate the 100th birthday of Robert Capa and the upcoming show ?Capa in Color? at the International Center of Photography, Magnum Photos has been asking photographers to reflect on the great photojournalist?s legacy?and his famous adage? in an online project called Get Closer 100 . Every day since Capa?s birthday, October 22, the agency has posted  a photo from Capa?s archive and invited the public to upload a photo of their own that mirrors it. They?ve also asked renowned photographers to share their response to the Capa image in the form of a single photo and a short written text. Photographers who have to date shared their thoughts on Capa include David Goldblatt, Richard Renaldi, Jane Evelyn Atwood, Thomas Ruff, Benjamin Lowy, Gideon Mendel, Stefano De Luigi, Thomas Hirshorn and many members of Magnum. Their thoughtful critiques on Capa?s ?get closer? rule are as individual as the photographers themselves. Magnum photographer Olivia Arthur notes that when she?s photographing people in intimate settings, she is often struggling photo tools to put more physical distance between herself and her subjects in order not to make them uncomfortable. She explains, ?Being close for me is about being inside someone?s world, when they feel relaxed about my being around. I try to let people have their space.? Micha Bar-Am of Magnum adds to Capa?s quote, ?But if you?re too close to the grindstone, you lose perspective.? Several photographers said that over time, they decided that Capa?s adage is a demand not for proximity but for empathy. Agnes Dherbeys, who won the Robert Capa Medal from the Overseas Press Club in 2011, paired a 1944 photo by Capa of a French woman accused of collaborating with the Germans with one of her own images from her series on the Red Shirts Crisis in Thailand in 2010. Dherbeys writes that she tried to empathize with the terror of the protester crouching in a street to take cover from Thai Army gunfire. Ashley Gilbertson, another Robert Capa Medal winner, questions the image Capa inspired of the ?swashbuckling photojournalist.? Gilbertson, who pairs a photo he shot in Falluja, Iraq in 2004 with one of Capa?s images of the D-Day landing on Omaha Beach in Normandy, says, ?For the record, as hard as I tried, I never got that swashbuckling thing.? The wide selection of Capa images underscore that he was much more than a conflict photographer.  Photojournalist Ed Kashi, who paired Capa?s photo of himself (seen in a mirror) photographing author John Steinbeck with a photo of Kashi?s father looking in a mirror, notes, ?Conflict photographers of today are obsessed with only the agony, graphic violence and misery. Capa recorded those qualities with a quiet dignity, but he was also able to capture happiness. He was capable of portraying life in it?s full range of emotions, not just misery and death.? There are 56 days left to the project. You can see Capa?s images?and upload your own response? at getcloser.magnumphotos.com.

Outlinining Outstanding Buildings

Posted at 11:52, 10/12/2013

Mexican artist Jose Dávila took his photographs of famous buildings from across the world and physically cut the buildings out of beautiful nature photography images, leaving only their outlines. Do we still recognize them? Do we have a visual memory of what was there? He poses these questions with his new book, There But Not (powerHouse Books, 2013). Dávila, trained as an architect, ?saw that by focusing on just the silhouette of major architectural works, while sill within their immediate environment, their grandeur was heightened beyond their undeniable visual allure,? powerHouse Books said in a statement. ?A unique appreciation for architectural form and creative genius develops when the viewer is confronted with the blank space where a building used to be, but now, on the page, is not.? To see more of Dávila?s cut outs, visit his site .
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://potd.pdnonline.com/2013/11/24623


{ Last Page } { Next Page }
Hosting door HQ ICT Systeembeheer