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PHOTOS: Newborn Puppies Make This Weekend Better

07:30, 21/7/2013 .. 0 comments .. Link
Newborn Puppy Photos From Their First Three Weeks Of Life Posted: 07/20/2013 8:36 am EDT Subscribe Follow: Animals , Baby Animals , Cute Animals , Dogs , Puppies , Newborn Puppy Photos , Dog , Newborn Puppies , Puppy , Puppy Photos , Books News Puppies are probably the best medicine for almost anything. So, with the country sweltering under a massive heat wave , we wanted to provide you, dear reader, with some incredible photos of newborn pups to make this week seem totally worth it. All of the puppies were photographed by Traer Scott and compiled in the book Newborn Puppies: Dogs in Their First Three Weeks . Scott told Vetstreet that catching the cuties in the act was harder than it may seem. ?You can put them in a puppy pile and they wiggle around, but that?s all they can really do,? she said. If you're looking for an adorable pooch of your own and are ready for the responsibility (because puppies do grow up), take a look at the ASPCA adoption site or Petfinder.com . Newborn Puppies Photos From Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Dogs in Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Photos From Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Dogs in Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Photos From Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Dogs in Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Photos From Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Dogs in Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Photos From Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Dogs in Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Photos From Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Dogs in Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Photos From Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Dogs in Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Photos From Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Dogs in Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Photos From Their First Three Weeks Newborn Puppies Dogs in Their First Three Weeks Contribute to this Story:
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Read An Excerpt Of Zealot By Reza Aslan

20:11, 17/7/2013 .. 0 comments .. Link
Zealot: The Life And Times Of Jesus Of Nazareth By Reza Aslan (EXCERPT) Posted: 07/17/2013 5:12 pm EDT  |  Updated: 07/17/2013 6:19 pm EDT Christianity , Religious Books , Jesus Zealot , Reza Aslan , Books About Jesus , Jesus , Reza Aslan Zealot , Zealot , Religion News Excerpted from ZEALOT: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth by Reza Aslan Copyright © 2013 by Reza Aslan. Excerpted by permission of Random House, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. It is published here with the expressed permission from the publisher. Introduction It is a miracle that we know anything at all about the man called Jesus of Nazareth. The itinerant preacher wandering from village to village clamoring about the end of the world, a band of ragged followers trailing behind, was a common a sight in Jesus? time?so common, in fact, that it had become a kind of caricature among the Roman elite. In a farcical passage about just such a figure, the Greek philosopher Celsus imagines a Jewish holy man roaming the Galilean countryside, shouting to no one in particular: ?I am God, or the servant of God, or a divine spirit. But I am coming, for the world is already in the throes of destruction. And you will soon see me coming with the power of heaven.? The first century was an era of apocalyptic expectation among the Jews of Palestine, the Roman designation for the vast tract of land encompassing modern day Israel/Palestine as well as large parts of Jordan, Syria, and Lebanon. Countless prophets, preachers, and messiahs tramped through the Holy Land delivering messages of God?s imminent judgment. Many of these so-called ?false messiahs? we know by name. A few are even mentioned in the New Testament. The prophet Theudas, according to the book of Acts, had four hundred disciples before Rome captured him and cut off his head. A mysterious charismatic figure known only as ?The Egyptian? raised an army of followers in the desert, nearly all of whom were massacred by Roman troops. In 4 B.C.E., the year in which most scholars believe Jesus of Nazareth was born, a poor shepherd named Athronges put a diadem on his head and crowned himself ?King of the Jews?; he and his followers were brutally cut down by a legion of soldiers. Another messianic aspirant, called simply ?The Samaritan,? was crucified by Pontius Pilate even though he raised no army and in no way challenged Rome?an indication that the authorities, sensing the apocalyptic fever in the air, had become extremely sensitive to any hint of sedition. There was Hezekiah the bandit chief, Simon of Peraea, Judas the Galilean, his grandson Menahem, Simon son of Giora, and Simon son of Kochba?all of whom declared messianic ambitions and all of whom were executed by Rome for doing so. Add to this list the Essene sect, some of whose members lived in seclusion atop the dry plateau of Qumran on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea; the first-century Jewish revolutionary party known as the Zealots, who helped launched a bloody war against Rome; and the fearsome bandit-assassins whom the Romans dubbed the Sicarii (the Daggermen), and the picture that emerges of first-century Palestine is of an era awash in messianic energy. It is difficult to place Jesus of Nazareth squarely within any of the known religiopolitical movements of his time. He was a man of profound contradictions, one day preaching a message of racial exclusion (?I was sent solely to the lost sheep of Israel?; Matthew 15:24), the next, of benevolent universalism (?Go and make disciples of all nations?; Matthew 28:19); sometimes calling for unconditional peace (?Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called the sons of God?; Matthew 5:9), sometimes promoting violence and conflict (?If you do not have a sword, go sell your cloak and buy one?; Luke 22:36). The problem with pinning down the historical Jesus is that, outside of the New Testament, there is almost no trace of the man who would so permanently alter the course of human history. The earliest and most reliable nonbiblical reference to Jesus comes from the first-century Jewish historian Flavius Josephus (d. 100 C.E.). In a brief throwaway passage in the Antiquities, Josephus writes of a fiendish Jewish high priest named Ananus who, after the death of the Roman governor Festus, unlawfully condemned a certain ?James, the brother of Jesus, the one they call messiah,? to stoning for transgression of the law. The passage moves on to relate what happened to Ananus after the new governor, Albinus, finally arrived in Jerusalem. Fleeting and dismissive as this allusion may be (the phrase ?the one they call messiah? is clearly meant to express derision), it nevertheless contains enormous significance for those searching for any sign of the historical Jesus. In a society without surnames, a common name like James required a specific appellation?a place of birth or a father?s name?to distinguish it from all the other men named James roaming around Palestine (hence, Jesus of Nazareth). In this case, James? appellative was provided by his fraternal connection to someone with whom Josephus assumes his audience would be familiar. The passage proves not only that ?Jesus, the one they call messiah? probably existed, but that by the year 94 C.E., when the Antiquities was written, he was widely recognized as the founder of a new and enduring movement. It is that movement, not its founder, that receives the attention of second-century historians like Tacitus (d. 118) and Pliny the Younger (d. 113), both of whom mention Jesus of Nazareth but reveal little about him, save for his arrest and execution?an important historical note, as we shall see, but one that sheds little light on the details of Jesus? life. We are therefore left with whatever information can be gleaned from the New Testament. The first written testimony we have about Jesus of Nazareth comes from the epistles of Paul, an early follower of Jesus who died sometime around 66 C.E. (Paul?s first epistle, 1 Thessalonians, can be dated between 48 and 50 C.E., some two decades after Jesus? death). The trouble with Paul, however, is that he displays an extraordinary lack of interest in the historical Jesus. Only three scenes from Jesus? life are ever mentioned in his epistles: the Last Supper (1 Corinthians 11:23?26), the crucifixion (1 Corinthians 2:2), and, most crucially for Paul, the resurrection, without which, he claims, ?our preaching is empty and your faith is in vain? (1 Corinthians 15:14). Paul may be an excellent source for those interested in the early formation of Christianity, but he is a poor guide for uncovering the historical Jesus. That leaves us with the gospels, which present their own set of problems. First of all, one must recognize that, with the possible exception of the gospel of Luke, none of the gospels we have were written by the person after whom they are named. That is true of most of the books in the New Testament. Such so-called pseudepigraphical works, or works attributed to but not written by a specific author, were extremely common in the ancient world and should by no means be thought of as forgeries. Naming a book after a person was a standard way of reflecting that person?s beliefs or representing his or her school of thought. Regardless, the gospels are not, nor were they ever meant to be, a historical documentation of Jesus? life. These are not eyewitness accounts of Jesus? words and deeds. They are testimonies of faith composed by communities of faith written many years after the events they describe. Simply put, the gospels tell us about Jesus the Christ, not Jesus the man. The most widely accepted theory on the formation of the gospels, ?the Two-Source Theory,? holds that Mark?s account was written first sometime after 70 C.E., some four decades after Jesus? death. Mark had at his disposal a collection of oral and perhaps a handful of written traditions that had been passed around by Jesus? earliest followers for years. By adding a chronological narrative to this jumble of traditions, Mark created a wholly new literary genre called gospel, Greek for ?good news.? Yet Mark?s gospel is a short and somewhat unsatisfying one for many Christians. There is no infancy narrative; Jesus simply arrives one day on the banks of the Jordan River to be baptized by John the Baptist. There are no resurrection appearances. Jesus is crucified. His body is placed in a tomb. A few days later, the tomb is empty. Even the earliest Christians were left wanting by Mark?s brusque account of Jesus? life and ministry, and so it was left to Mark?s successors, Matthew and Luke, to improve upon the original text. Two decades after Mark, between 90 and 100 C.E., the authors of Matthew and Luke, working independently of each other and with Mark?s manuscript as a template, updated the gospel story by adding their own unique traditions, including two different and conflicting infancy narratives as well as a series of elaborate resurrection stories to satisfy their Christian readers. Matthew and Luke also relied on what must have been an early and fairly well distributed collection of Jesus? sayings that scholars have termed Q (German for Quelle, or ?source?). Although we no longer have any physical copies of this document, we can infer its contents by compiling those verses that Matthew and Luke share in common but that do not appear in Mark. Together, these three gospels?Mark, Matthew, and Luke?became known as the Synoptics (Greek for ?viewed together?) because they more or less present a common narrative and chronology about the life and ministry of Jesus, one that is greatly at odds with the fourth gospel, John, which was likely written soon after the close of the first century, between 100 and 120 C.E. These, then, are the canonized gospels. But they are not the only gospels. We now have access to an entire library of noncanonical scriptures written mostly in the second and third centuries that provides a vastly different perspective on the life of Jesus of Nazareth. These include the Gospel of Thomas, the Gospel of Philip, the Secret Book of John, the Gospel of Mary Magdalene, and a host of other so-called ?Gnostic writings? discovered in Upper Egypt, near the town of Nag Hammadi, in 1945. Though they were left out of what would ultimately become the New Testament, these books are significant in that they demonstrate the dramatic divergence of opinion that existed over who Jesus was and what Jesus meant, even among those who walked with him, who shared his bread and ate with him, who heard his words and prayed with him. In the end, there are only two hard historical facts about Jesus of Nazareth upon which we can confidently rely: the first is that Jesus was a Jew who led a popular Jewish movement in Palestine at the beginning of the first century C.E.; the second is that Rome crucified him for doing so. By themselves these two facts cannot provide a complete portrait of the life of a man who lived two thousand years ago. But when combined with all we know about the tumultuous era in which Jesus lived?and thanks to the Romans, we know a great deal?these two facts can help paint a picture of Jesus of Nazareth that may be more historically accurate than the one painted by the gospels. Indeed, the Jesus that emerges from this historical exercise?a zealous revolutionary swept up, as all Jews of the era were, in the religious and political turmoil of first-century Palestine?bears little resemblance to the image of the gentle shepherd cultivated by the early Christian community. Consider this: Crucifixion was a punishment that Rome reserved almost exclusively for the crime of sedition. The plaque the Romans placed above Jesus? head as he writhed in pain??King of the Jews??was called a titulus and, despite common perception, was not meant to be sarcastic. Every criminal who hung on a cross received a plaque declaring the specific crime for which he was being executed. Jesus? crime, in the eyes of Rome, was striving for kingly rule (i.e. treason), the same crime for which nearly every other messianic aspirant of the time was killed. Nor did Jesus die alone. The gospels claim that on either side of Jesus hung men who in Greek are called lestai, a word often rendered into English as ?thieves? but that actually means ?bandits? and was the most common Roman designation for an insurrectionist or rebel. Three rebels on a hill covered in crosses, each cross bearing the racked and bloodied body of a man who dared defy the will of Rome. That image alone should cast doubt upon the gospels? portrayal of Jesus as a man of unconditional peace almost wholly insulated from the political upheavals of his time. The notion that the leader of a popular messianic movement calling for the imposition of the ?Kingdom of God??a term that would have been understood by Jew and gentile alike as implying revolt against Rome?could have remained uninvolved in the revolutionary fervor that had gripped nearly every Jew in Judea is simply ridiculous. Why would the gospel writers go to such lengths to temper the revolutionary nature of Jesus? message and movement? To answer this question we must first recognize that almost every gospel story written about the life and mission of Jesus of Nazareth was composed after the Jewish rebellion against Rome in 66 C.E. In that year, a band of Jewish rebels, spurred by their zeal for God, roused their fellow Jews in revolt. Miraculously, the rebels managed to liberate the Holy Land from the Roman occupation. For four glorious years, the city of God was once again under Jewish control. Then, in 70 C.E., the Romans returned. After a brief siege of Jerusalem, the soldiers breached the city walls and unleashed an orgy of violence upon its residents. They butchered everyone in their path, heaping corpses on the Temple Mount. A river of blood flowed down the cobblestone streets. When the massacre was complete, the soldiers set fire to the Temple of God. The fires spread beyond the Temple Mount, engulfing Jerusalem?s meadows, the farms, the olive trees. Everything burned. So complete was the devastation wrought upon the holy city that Josephus writes there was nothing left to prove Jerusalem had ever been inhabited. Tens of thousands of Jews were slaughtered. The rest were marched out of the city in chains. The spiritual trauma faced by the Jews in the wake of that catastrophic event is hard to imagine. Exiled from the land promised them by God, forced to live as outcasts among the pagans of the Roman Empire, the rabbis of the second century gradually and deliberately divorced Judaism from the radical messianic nationalism that had launched the ill-fated war with Rome. The Torah replaced the Temple in the center of Jewish life, and rabbinic Judaism emerged. The Christians, too, felt the need to distance themselves from the revolutionary zeal that had led to the sacking of Jerusalem, not only because it allowed the early church to ward off the wrath of a deeply vengeful Rome, but also because, with the Jewish religion having become pariah, the Romans had become the primary target of the church?s evangelism. Thus began the long process of transforming Jesus from a revolutionary Jewish nationalist into a peaceful spiritual leader with no interest in any earthly matter. That was a Jesus the Romans could accept, and in fact did accept three centuries later when the Roman emperor Flavius Theodosius (d. 395) made the itinerant Jewish preacher?s movement the official religion of the state, and what we now recognize as orthodox Christianity was born. This book is an attempt to reclaim, as much as possible, the Jesus of history, the Jesus before Christianity: the politically conscious Jewish revolutionary who, two thousand years ago, walked across the Galilean countryside, gathering followers for a messianic movement with the goal of establishing the Kingdom of God but whose mission failed when, after a provocative entry into Jerusalem and a brazen attack on the Temple, he was arrested and executed by Rome for the crime of sedition. It is also about how, in the aftermath of Jesus? failure to establish God?s reign on earth, his followers reinterpreted not only Jesus? mission and identity, but also the very nature and definition of the Jewish messiah. There are those who consider such an endeavor to be a waste of time, believing the Jesus of history to be irrevocably lost and incapable of recovery. Long gone are the heady days of ?the quest for the historical Jesus,? when scholars confidently proclaimed that modern scientific tools and historical research would allow us to uncover Jesus? true identity. The real Jesus no longer matters, these scholars argue. We should focus instead on the only Jesus that is accessible to us: Jesus the Christ. Granted, writing a biography of Jesus of Nazareth is not like writing a biography of Napoleon Bonaparte. The task is somewhat akin to putting together a massive puzzle with only a few of the pieces in hand; one has no choice but to fill in the rest of the puzzle based on the best, most educated guess of what the completed image should look like. The great Christian theologian Rudolf Bultmann liked to say that the quest for the historical Jesus is ultimately an internal quest. Scholars tend to see the Jesus they want to see. Too often they see themselves?their own reflection?in the image of Jesus they have constructed. And yet that best, most educated guess may be enough to, at the very least, question our most basic assumptions about Jesus of Nazareth. If we expose the claims of the gospels to the heat of historical analysis, we can purge the scriptures of their literary and theological flourishes and forge a far more accurate picture of the Jesus of history. Indeed, if we commit to placing Jesus firmly within the social, religious, and political context of the era in which he lived?an era marked by the slow burn of a revolt against Rome that would forever transform the faith and practice of Judaism?then, in some ways, his biography writes itself. The Jesus that is uncovered in the process may not be the Jesus we expect; he certainly will not be the Jesus that most modern Christians would recognize. But in the end, he is the only Jesus that we can access by historical means. Everything else is a matter of faith. Contribute to this Story:
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Josh Fleet: A Psychospiritual Odyssey Among Two Lost Tribes Of American Pop Culture

18:13, 13/7/2013 .. 0 comments .. Link
Nathan Rabin's Psychospiritual Odyssey Among Two Lost Tribes of American Pop Culture Posted: 06/14/2013 12:15 pm Follow Subscribe Nathan Rabin is no stranger to manic descents into the darkest corners of mind, body and soul. His memoir, "The Big Rewind," told through the lens of pop culture, is rife with trauma, heartbreak, neglect and often-debilitating neuroses. So, perhaps it's not surprising that soon after setting out to research and write "You Don't Know Me But You Don't Like Me: Phish, Insane Clown Posse and My Misadventures With Two of Music's Most Maligned Tribes," Rabin tumbled in a downward spiral to the pits of emotional hell. What is surprising -- to the author and his dear readers alike -- is that the knee-jerk, stereotype-based derision he initially felt toward Phish and Insane Clown Posse soon blossomed into full-blown love and obsession. "Going to see Phish," he said, "is now one of my favorite things. In. The. World." Documenting two years of following Phish and the ICP to the farthest reaches of his sanity and soul, Rabin's new book is a chronicle of teshuvah -- repentance and return -- from the sin of the Golden Cliche. As a Jewish fan of Phish whose devotion to the music regularly veers toward heresy, snagging an advance copy of "You Don't Know Me" was for me like finding the keys to the Holy of Holies while the High Priest is out on paid leave from his Temple duties. The book was a revelatory, face-to-face dialogue with divinity. Opening the book for the first time and discovering that Rabin's introduction to the whimsical world of Phish was in Miami in 2009, and that his quest for jamband understanding had a lot do with falling in love with a girl, a hunch I once had about the deeply spiritual, serendipitous underpinnings of Phish's music and the surrounding scene began to seem all the more real. Three years and some months ago, I made the pilgrimage to Miami for four consecutive nights of Phish. I was in high school in 2004 when the band broke up, presumably forever. The colorful caravan of intoxicating music, myth and camaraderie had seemingly passed me by, and the two innocent shows I'd managed to convince my parents to pay for and let me attend taunted and teased my memory. So Miami '09 was an emotional homecoming. The venue was mere hours from my college, friends from every facet of my life would be there and, after following Phish's reunion shows with spine-tingling jealousy earlier in the year from my apartment in Jerusalem, I had tickets to all four nights of rapturous, musical bliss. Those shows planted a seed in my soul: I would write a book about the connection between Phish's nightly feats of improvisational wizardry and the laughably ubiquitous presence of other members of my tribe -- the Jews -- within Phish's universe, framed as a review of the four shows in Miami '09. One of the first stories I wrote as an intern at HuffPost was " Going to Synagogue at Madison Square Garden ," about the very Jewish experience of dancing ecstatically on New Year's Eve 2010 at a Phish concert. Fast forward a few years and I'm now engaged to an amazing, Phish-loving Jewess whom I met because of that story. A few weeks from now, we will pack the car and hit the road to follow Phish along the East Coast before moving to Jerusalem later this summer. In "You Don't Know Me," albeit a thoroughly secular source, I found confirmation for my theories about the holiness of Phish's music. "When you have these kind of transcendent concert experiences, it has as much to do if not more to do with the audience than the band itself," Rabin told me on the eve of the book's publication. "There are so many stories at every show, at every festival, at every concert, and they just don't get told. And this was an attempt to tell one of those stories, or a couple of those stories, and preserve for posterity what is almost by definition kind of an ephemeral, transitory thing: being at a show and feeling these emotions, connecting not just with the music, but to this world, to this history, to this whole kind of tradition." In his deftly told tale, ICP fans evolve from an illiterate horde of trailer trash-talkers to an all-embracing family of misfits in clown makeup, while the denizens of Phishland shed the collective patchouli-stained drug rug of privileged iniquity and emerge as care-free spiritual seekers of the highest degree. From darkness to light, Rabin himself transforms on tour. Instead of compulsively obsessing over the past in order to manufacture some perfect, impossible future, cavorting at ICP and Phish's respective carnivals of darkness and light opened his eyes to the "sacred present." Asked if he'll be spotted on tour again this summer, his response was telling. "God willing," he said, before laughing maniacally. A longer, nerdier version of this appeared in Hidden Track . Loading Slideshow Juggalo Phish fans began gathering on Friday, September 2, 2011 at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City to camp for the three nights of Phish concerts. Elizabeth Caspain aka "Mystic Diva" from Flagstaff, AZ shows off her happy face shades. Cyrus McCrimmon, Phish fans began gathering on Friday, September 2, 2011 at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City to camp for the three nights of Phish concerts. Elizabeth Caspain aka 'Mystic Diva' from Flagstaff, AZ shows off her happy face shades. (Photo By Cyrus McCrimmon/The Denver Post via Getty Images) Gathering of the Juggalos It may be one of the largest beach ball parties ever as the inflatable objects appeared while the band Phish took the stage at Super Ball IX at Watkins Glen International Speedway Saturday July 2, 2011. Close to 60,000 were expected for the three day event that ends Sunday. The last concert to be held at the venue was in 1973 where over 600,000 watched headliners The Grateful Dead perform. (AP Photo/Finger Lakes Times,Spencer Tulis) Phish Returns At Hampton Coliseum - Day 2 - Backstage And Atmosphere HAMPTON, VA - MARCH 07: Phish performs at the Hampton Coliseum on March 7, 2009 in Hampton, Virginia. (Photo by C. Taylor Crothers/FilmMagic) Phish New Years Eve Concert Audience during Phish New Years Eve Concert at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York, United States. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Juggalette Phish From left, Ken and Eric Anderson drove from Denver, Colo., for Phish's concert at Hampton Coliseum in Hampton, Virginia, on Friday, March 6, 2009. (Photo by Rob Ostermaier/Newport News Daily Press/MCT via Getty Images) Juggalo Phish fans showed their enthusiam as Phish jammed through their opening number Wednesday night in Denver. Phish fans showed their enthusiam as Phish jammed through their opening number Wednesday night in Denver. (Photo By Karl Gehring/The Denver Post via Getty Images) Juggalo Phish fans began gathering on Friday, September 2, 2011 at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City to camp for the three nights of Phish concerts. Walter Clymer aka "Pyro Gypsy" from a Alaska plays his guitar after putting his tent together on the soc Phish fans began gathering on Friday, September 2, 2011 at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City to camp for the three nights of Phish concerts. Walter Clymer aka 'Pyro Gypsy' from a Alaska plays his guitar after putting his tent together on the soccer fields. Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post (Photo By Cyrus McCrimmon/The Denver Post via Getty Images) Gathering of the Juggalos Phish fans began gathering on Friday, September 2, 2011 at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City to camp for the three nights of Phish concerts. Rory Wilson of Boulder carries her hula hoops for dancing in the camping area. Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denv Phish fans began gathering on Friday, September 2, 2011 at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City to camp for the three nights of Phish concerts. Rory Wilson of Boulder carries her hula hoops for dancing in the camping area. Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post (Photo By Cyrus McCrimmon/The Denver Post via Getty Images) The 2003 BillBoard Music Awards - Arrival LAS VEGAS - DECEMBER 10: The Insane Clwon Posse attends the 2003 Billboard Music Awards at the MGM Grand Garden Arena December 10, 2003 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The 14th annual ceremony airs live tonight on FOX 8:00-10:00 PM ET Live/PT. (Photo by Carlo Allegri/Getty Images) Phish Returns at Hampton Coliseum - Day 3 - Concert HAMPTON, VA - MARCH 08: Trey Anastasio of Phish performs at the Hampton Coliseum on March 8, 2009 in Hampton, Virginia. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish Phish performs during the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tenn., Sunday, June 10, 2012. (AP Photo/Dave Martin) Phish fans began gathering on Friday, September 2, 2011 at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City to camp for the three nights of Phish concerts. Bob Blanding of Winter Park, CO stakes down his leaf for shelter on the soccer fields. Cyrus McCrimmon, Phish fans began gathering on Friday, September 2, 2011 at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City to camp for the three nights of Phish concerts. Bob Blanding of Winter Park, CO stakes down his leaf for shelter on the soccer fields. Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post (Photo By Cyrus McCrimmon/The Denver Post via Getty Images) 2011 Outside Lands Music And Arts Fesitval - Lands End Stage - Day 1 Phish performs at the Lands End Stage during the 2011 Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival held at Golden Gate Park on August 12, 2011 in San Francisco, California. Disco Man 2010 2012 Bonnaroo Music And Arts Festival - Day 4 MANCHESTER, TN - JUNE 10: Trey Anastasio and Phish perform at Day 4 of the Bonnaroo Music And Arts Festival on June 10, 2012 in Manchester, Tennessee. (Photo by Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images) 2011 Outside Lands Music And Arts Festival - Lands End Stage - Day 1 SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 12: Phish music fans attend the Lands End Stage during the 2011 Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival held at Golden Gate Park on August 12, 2011 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) 2011 Outside Lands Music And Arts Festival - Lands End Stage - Day 1 SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 12: Phish performs at the Lands End Stage during the 2011 Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival held at Golden Gate Park on August 12, 2011 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish in Concert at Wetlands - June 1990 Phish during Phish in Concert at Wetlands - June 1990 at Wetlands in New York City, New York, United States. (Photo by Steve Eichner/WireImage) 2011 Outside Lands Music And Arts Festival - Lands End Stage - Day 1 SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 12: Phish performs at the Lands End Stage during the 2011 Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival held at Golden Gate Park on August 12, 2011 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish - Commerce City, CO COMMERCE CITY, CO - AUGUST 31: Atmosphere as Phish fans attend the first concert in a set of three Phish concerts at Dick's Sporting Goods Park on August 31, 2012 in Commerce City, Colorado. (Photo by Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images) 2011 Outside Lands Music And Arts Festival - Lands End Stage - Day 1 SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 12: Phish performs at the Lands End Stage during the 2011 Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival held at Golden Gate Park on August 12, 2011 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish in Concert 1995 - Mountain View CA MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA - SEPTEMBER 30: Phish drum circle scene at Shoreline Amphitheatre on September 30, 1995 in Mountain View California. (Photo by Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images) 2011 Outside Lands Music And Arts Festival - Lands End Stage - Day 1 SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 12: Phish performs at the Lands End Stage during the 2011 Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival held at Golden Gate Park on August 12, 2011 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish Returns At Hampton Coliseum HAMPTON, VA - MARCH 06: Phish Fans attend their return concert at the Hampton Coliseum on March 6, 2009 in Hampton, Virginia. (Photo by Cory Schwartz/Getty Images) 2011 Outside Lands Music And Arts Festival - Lands End Stage - Day 1 SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 12: Phish performs at the Lands End Stage during the 2011 Outside Lands Music and Arts Festival held at Golden Gate Park on August 12, 2011 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish's Festival 8 At The Empire Polo Club - Day 2 INDIO, CA - OCTOBER 31: A general view of day two of the Phish Festival 8 on October 31, 2009 in Indio, California. (Photo by Dove Shore/Getty Images) Bonnaroo 2009 - Day 4 - Phish MANCHESTER, TN - JUNE 14: General view during Phish performance on stage during Bonnaroo 2009 on June 14, 2009 in Manchester, Tennessee. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) 2009 Bonnaroo Music And Arts Festival - Day 2 MANCHESTER, TN - JUNE 12: Artist Joe Young works on a weekend long painting during Phish's performance at the 2009 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival on June 12, 2009 in Manchester, Tennessee. (Photo by Rob Loud/Getty Images) 2009 Bonnaroo Music And Arts Festival - Day 2 MANCHESTER, TN - JUNE 12: Artist Joe Young works on a weekend long painting during Phish's performance at the 2009 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival on June 12, 2009 in Manchester, Tennessee. (Photo by Rob Loud/Getty Images) Bonnaroo 2009 - Day 2 - Phish MANCHESTER, TN - JUNE 12: Phish performs on stage during Bonnaroo 2009 on June 12, 2009 in Manchester, Tennessee. (Photo by C. Taylor Crothers/FilmMagic) Phish Returns At Hampton Coliseum - Day 2 - Backstage And Atmosphere HAMPTON, VA - MARCH 07: Phish performs at the Hampton Coliseum on March 7, 2009 in Hampton, Virginia. (Photo by C. Taylor Crothers/FilmMagic) Phish Returns At Hampton Coliseum - Day 2 - Backstage And Atmosphere HAMPTON, VA - MARCH 07: A general view during Phish Returns at the Hampton Coliseum on March 7, 2009 in Hampton, Virginia. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish Returns at Hampton Coliseum - Day 3 - Concert HAMPTON, VA - MARCH 08: Trey Anastasio and Mike Gordon of Phish performs at the Hampton Coliseum on March 8, 2009 in Hampton, Virginia. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish Returns At Hampton Coliseum HAMPTON, VA - MARCH 06: Mechandise is sold prior to the Phish concert at the Hampton Coliseum on March 6, 2009 in Hampton, Virginia. (Photo by Cory Schwartz/Getty Images) Phish Returns at Hampton Coliseum - Day 1 - Concert HAMPTON, VA - MARCH 06: Page McConnell, Trey Anastasio, Mike Gordon and Jon Fishman of Phish perform at the Hampton Coliseum on March 6, 2009 in Hampton, Virginia. (Photo by C. Taylor Crothers/FilmMagic) Phish Returns At Hampton Coliseum - Day 1 - Concert HAMPTON, VA - MARCH 06: Page McConnell and Trey Anastasio of Phish perform at the Hampton Coliseum on March 6, 2009 in Hampton, Virginia. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish Returns At Hampton Coliseum Day 2 - Backstage And Atmosphere HAMPTON, VA - MARCH 07: A general view during Phish Returns at the Hampton Coliseum on March 7, 2009 in Hampton, Virginia. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish Performs at Keyspan Park in Coney Island - June 17, 2004 Phish Fans (Photo by James Devaney/WireImage) Phish IT Festival Day 2 Phish (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish IT Festival Phish (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish New Years Eve Concert Audience during Phish New Years Eve Concert at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York, United States. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic) Phish In Concert New Year's Eve - December 31, 1999 Atmosphere during Phish In Concert New Year's Eve - December 31, 1999 at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation in Big Cypress, Florida, United States. (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage) Phish Returns At Hampton Coliseum - Day 2 - Backstage And Atmosphere HAMPTON, VA - MARCH 07: Phish performs at the Hampton Coliseum on March 7, 2009 in Hampton, Virginia. (Photo by C. Taylor Crothers/FilmMagic) Phish In Concert New Year's Eve - December 31, 1999 Atmosphere during Phish In Concert New Year's Eve - December 31, 1999 at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation in Big Cypress, Florida, United States. (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage) Phish In Concert New Year's Eve - December 31, 1999 Atmosphere during Phish In Concert New Year's Eve - December 31, 1999 at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation in Big Cypress, Florida, United States. (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./WireImage)   Follow Josh Fleet on Twitter: www.twitter.com/JoshLyleFleet FOLLOW RELIGION
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Matthue Roth: LOOK: Kafka For Kids

01:30, 10/7/2013 .. 0 comments .. Link
Kafka for Kids (PHOTOS) Posted: 06/05/2013 11:32 am Follow Subscribe Children's books scare the living daylights out of me. One night my daughters asked me to read the book "Outside Over There" to them. It's by Maurice Sendak, the guy who wrote "Where the Wild Things Are." In the book, a young girl, maybe 4 years old, is babysitting for her baby brother. Some goblins steal the baby away. She has to fight a goblin army and rescue him. I was waking up in cold sweats all night. My kids loved it. They asked to read it again the next night. And the next night. Children are way more comfortable with strangeness and scariness than adults. The world is a strange and new place to them. Everything is wondrous. Everything is terrifying. The average refrigerator is way taller than your average toddler. One night I was reading a book by Franz Kafka, the odd and eerie storyteller who lived in Prague, whose stories are resplendent with the city's own mystery and beauty and disturbing weirdness. My daughters asked me what I was reading, and if I could read it to them. I wasn't going to. Then I did. Why not? I thought. What's the worst that could happen? And before you knew it -- night after night, they asked for Kafka. A boy who changes into a giant insect. Talking jaguars who debate the philosophical implications of hunting -- and then go hunting anyway. A girl who runs away and becomes the leader of a group of monsters. That's the Kafka my kids discovered. That's the Kafka my kids made me realize the scariness, and the beauty, that had been there all along. Loading Slideshow
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SOME QUIET PLACE

07:19, 8/7/2013 .. 0 comments .. Link
Add to my list This book is in your list Remove KIRKUS REVIEW Haunting, chilling and achingly romantic, Sutton?s debut novel for teens will keep readers up until the wee hours, unable to tear themselves away from this strange and beautifully crafted story. Elizabeth Caldwell can?t feel emotions, yet she sees them everywhere, human in appearance, standing alongside their ?summons.? Guilt and Worry flank the mother of a dying friend. Resentment grips the shoulder of her bruised and battered mother. Elizabeth can see them, acknowledge their power and even speak to them, but ever since the night of a terrible car accident when she was 4, the only sensation Elizabeth is capable of mustering is a numb nothingness. The only emotion that still bothers to come calling is Fear, a menacing and surprisingly seductive suitor who seems as determined as Elizabeth to uncover the truth behind who and what she truly is?no matter what the cost. Elizabeth may not be able to feel, but her novel-long dance with Fear is as sexy and intense as any couple?s in recent memory. This is a testament to Elizabeth?s brilliantly crafted narrative voice. Reminiscent of Death in Markus Zusak?s The Book Thief, she shares her story with the cold detachment of the emotionless yet still manages to convey the urgent and desperate nature of her search for the truth. Chills and goose bumps of the very best kind accompany this haunting, memorable achievement. (Paranormal romance. 14 & up) Pub Date: July 8th, 2013 ISBN: 978-0-7387-3643-3
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From Kids' Books To Erotica, Tomi Ungerer's 'Far Out' Life

13:10, 6/7/2013 .. 0 comments .. Link
Tomi UngererFrom Kids' Books To Erotica, Tomi Ungerer's 'Far Out' Life July 01, 2013 2:34 PM Transcript   Tomi Ungerer's 1967 book Moon Man follows its lonely protagonist as he visits Earth for the very first time. Tomi Ungerer Children's-book writer Maurice Sendak learned a lot from author and artist Tomi Ungerer. In Far Out Isn't Far Enough, a new documentary about Ungerer, Sendak says, "I learned to be braver than I was. I think that's why [ Where The Wild Things Are ] was partly Tomi ? his energy, his spirit. I'm proud of the fact that we helped change the scene in America so that children were dealt with like the intelligent little animals we know they are." With a champion in their shared editor, Ursula Nordstrom, Sendak and Ungerer broke the rules of American children's literature in the 1950s and '60s. They created stories and illustrations that many adults found too frightening and rebellious for children ? but that kids themselves loved. Ungerer's series of books about the Mellops, a family of adventurous and resourceful pigs who often found themselves in scary situations, was particularly popular. Ungerer didn't mind scaring kids, because he believed in their ability to cope with and adapt to life's difficulties. He himself had witnessed terrifying things as a child growing up on the French-German border, in Alsace, during World War II. His work, he says, reflects his experience. Tomi Ungerer has published more than 140 books. Sam Norval/Corner of the Cave Media Tomi Ungerer has published more than 140 books. Sam Norval/Corner of the Cave Media "Most of my children's books have fear elements," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "But I must say, too, to balance this fact, that the children in my books are never scared. ... I think fear is an element which is instilled by the adults a lot of time. I remember even in the bombings and whatever, we were always joking away." Many Americans have never heard of Ungerer because, in the early 1970s, his books were virtually banished in the United States after he started doing erotic illustrations for books targeted at adults. Ungerer soon returned to Europe, where he lives today. He says Europeans are much more accepting of the fact that his work can plumb the imaginations of both children and adults. "In Europe," he says, "I have absolutely no problem. I did an erotic book which is based on the Kama Sutra, but instead of human beings, the positions are taken up by frogs. People come up to me and say, 'I was brought up with you. I was 13 years old, and I saved money to buy your Kama Sutra.' " Interview Highlights On fear versus anxiety "To be scared is one thing; anxiety is another one. ... If you are in a battle and you have bombs and bullets and shrapnel and everything is going up in the air, that's why you can be scared. But it doesn't really compare to the anxiety. You see, the anxiety ... is something much deeper in a way, because it sticks to you all the time. Are we going to make another day? Are we going to be arrested? ... It's all the impending menace, you know, all the time, all the time. And that's anxiety. I find anxiety worse than fear." On growing up in Hitler's Germany "I remember I had to do a portrait of the Fuhrer, you know, giving a speech, and put a stein of beer on this thing. Well, the Fuhrer didn't drink, but still, you know, nobody ever objected. The thing is, no matter what tyranny, you can always get away, maybe not with murder, but with a few other things. And your mind is always free. Nobody can take away your mind. "We were brought up to become soldiers. ... [T]hey would say, 'Don't think. The Fuhrer thinks for you.' But then it was reassuring, too, because I was not a good pupil, and then the teachers would say to me ... 'Don't worry, the Fuhrer needs artists and all that.' I mean, the whole thing was geared to win over the children away from their parents." On his early career in New York "It was a land of opportunity. It was really incredible how everybody was so nice. In those days you could call any art director or editor just like this, and the secretary would give you an appointment and you could come there and show your work. I remember I arrived with $60 in my pocket, so I didn't have a portfolio, and I was carrying just my drawings, you know, under my arms. Related NPR Stories Lemony Snicket Dons A Trenchcoat "And one day it started raining, and I went into a pharmacy ? it was on 43rd Street and Broadway, and I think it's still there. And I asked for a box, you see, for my drawings. So they gave me a box that created quite a sensation. because it was a wholesale box for condoms. "[I]t was incredible how quickly I was able to settle down and work. And I would say I was enough of [a] success to be able to buy a house in New York three or four years later. ... And I'm very grateful for that, really. New York ? there's no city in my life I've ever loved as much as New York." On his mother's affection "My answer for [Maurice Sendak and Else Holmelund Minarik's] A Kiss for Little Bear was No Kiss for Mother , because ... my mother loved me much too much, and she poured her affection in the most sloppy ways ? I mean over my cheeks and everywhere. And I couldn't stand to be kissed or even touched by my mother. She really overdid it." On being forced to learn German "The Nazis arrived, and after three months it was forbidden to speak a word of French. You could be arrested for a bonjour or just a merci. Just any word in French, you could be immediately arrested. I had to learn German in three months ? which shows you that with a knife on your neck, you can learn a language in three months."
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Undercover: The True Story of Britain's Secret Police Paul Lewis and Rob Evans – review

11:43, 29/6/2013 .. 0 comments .. Link
Undercover: The True Story of Britain's Secret Police Paul Lewis and Rob Evans ? review An exposé of Britain's police spies is shocking and disheartening Jump to comments (?) Former police office turned whistleblower Peter Francis. Photograph: Graham Turner for the Guardian Overexcitable publishers like to bandy around words such as "explosive" and "shocking" when trying to flog their books, even though generally you could substitute them for ones such as "mildly interesting". Not with Undercover, though. Subtitled "The True Story of Britain's Secret Police ", and doggedly written and researched by Guardian journalists Rob Evans and Paul Lewis, the revelations in its pages are genuinely explosive. And even though a lot of the material was in last week's news and formed the basis of a Channel 4's Dispatches, reading it line by line, deception by deception, is genuinely shocking. Undercover: The True Story of Britain's Secret Police by Paul Lewis, Rob Evans Buy the book Tell us what you think: Star-rate and review this book It boggles my mind that this has been going on in our name, sanctioned by our state, paid for with our taxes. To recap, briefly, for those who have been under a stone , Evans and Lewis revealed last week that undercover police officers were asked to find "dirt" on the family of Stephen Lawrence in order to smear and discredit them. What's more, they alleged that one of the authors of the McLibel leaflet , the subject of the longest civil trial in British history, costing McDonald's millions of pounds in legal fees, was another undercover police officer. "As our cops are shamed by cover-ups and corruption," said a headline in the Sun, that well-known voice of anti-establishment dissent, "We ask: can we ever trust them?" It's a fair question, and one that would be interesting to ask people before and after they've read the book. Because it's the steady accumulation of detail that's so compelling. The testimony of person after person who was taken in, deceived, gulled, who knew the officers for years ? who thought of them as best friends, or lovers, or life partners, or the father of their children, who had no inkling that they were part of an elaborate state-sponsored spy-ring that intruded on the most intimate parts of their lives. And who, in most cases, had done nothing more nefarious than be a member of a peaceful protest group, and some of them not even that. The officers involved worked for the Special Demonstration Squad (SDS), a top-secret unit within special branch that was formed in 1968. Its unofficial motto was "By Any Means Necessary" and an officer called "Pete Black", the whistleblower who was the source for many of the revelations about how the unit operated and who unmasked himself last week as Peter Francis , relates how sex was just another tactic. "Basically," he tells them, "it's just regarded as part of the job." The allegations about the Lawrence family were what made the headlines last week ? another terrible blow after so many terrible blows. But it's the revelations about the women who were involved with these officers that I can't get out of my head. There is much else: the dead children's names that were stolen, the breakdowns suffered when officers discovered they couldn't simply return to their "real life", the often hilarious detail of spycraft gone wrong (the activist pals of one undercover officer give him the nickname "detective inspector"; another is "Lynn the cop"). But it is the women who are the emotional heart of this book and it is hearing from them, the victims in all this, in their own words, that gives it such power. "Charlotte", who recounts how she got home from work on 14 June last year, sat in the garden to read the Daily Mail with a cup of coffee and spotted a photo of Robert Lambert or, as she knew him, Bob Robinson, the father of her child, who she had not seen for 24 years. "And there was his face staring back at me from the paper. I went into shock, I felt like I couldn't breathe and I started shaking." She has subsequently received psychiatric treatment. Or Helen Steel, who met John Dines, aka John Barker, and had a relationship with him for two years. "He said he wanted to spend the rest of life with me. In a short space of time I fell absolutely madly in love with him in a way that I had never fallen in love with anyone before or since." Or "Alison", a secondary school teacher who lived with Mark Cassidy for four years, but who she subsequently discovered was using her as a ploy to get close to activist groups whose mission was ? irony alert! ? to uncover allegations of police corruption. And then he vanished from her life. "How much of the relationship was real?" she asks. "I have, for the last 13 years, questioned my own judgment." And the targets of these elaborate and devastating intrigues? They were "50-year-old vegan cake-makers", members of the Clandestine Insurgent Rebel Clown Army, a pensioner who didn't want his local duck pond filled with ash. And, while this may be the "true story" of the secret police, it's almost definitely not the whole story. At the end of the book, Evans and Lewis estimate there may be 100, even 150 more covert officers out there. A few weeks ago, I wrote in another article that books don't change anything any more. Now I'm hoping I was wrong. And when it's the Sun that points out that the police are looking "less like the long arm of the law and more like an organised conspiracy against the people they are meant to protect", it's surely time that someone ? the PM? Parliament? Us? ? changes something. Sign up for the Guardian Today Our editors' picks for the day's top news and commentary delivered to your inbox each morning.
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LOOK: Anderson Cooper Gets Animated

16:35, 19/6/2013 .. 0 comments .. Link
anderson cooper comic bookAnderson Cooper Comic Book Reflects CNN Anchor's Life As Openly Gay Journalist (PHOTO) The Huffington Post  |  By Glennisha Morgan Posted: 06/19/2013 10:25 am EDT  |  Updated: 06/19/2013 10:34 am EDT Sign Up Follow: Anderson Cooper , Anderson Cooper Comic Book , Anderson Cooper Bio , Anderson Cooper Biography , Anderson Cooper Comic Biography , Bluewater Productions , Comic Books , Journalists , Books News Anderson Cooper has just became the subject of Bluewater Production's latest comic book. The biographical project will be released on June 19 and is titled "Political Power." The book will reflect his life as an out and proud gay journalist, written by comic book author Michael Troy. In a press release sent to HuffPost Gay Voices, Troy said he was honored to tell Cooper's story. ?Anderson Cooper the man is easily as fascinating as the stories he reports," Troy said. "I was honored to bring his story to life." Cooper's comic will be released amongst others such as Jon Stewart, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Marco Rubio. Check out the cover below. Also on HuffPost: Loading Slideshow Jodie Foster, 2013 The "Silence of the Lambs" star ended years of rampant media speculation when she casually came out of the closet while accepting her Cecil B. Demille award at the 2013 Golden Globes. "I already did my coming out about a thousand years ago, back in the Stone Age," she said in the speech. "In those very quaint days when a fragile young girl would open up to trusted friends, and family, coworkers and then gradually, proudly, to everyone who knew her." Gillian Anderson, 2012 The "X-Files" actress revealed she's had numerous relationships with women in a 2012 interview with Out magazine. The 43-year-old mother of three, who's long enjoyed a sizable lesbian fanbase, told Out that she first had a relationship with a woman while still in high school, after moving from her native England to suburban Michigan. "If I had thought I was 100 percent gay, would it have been a different experience for me?" Anderson, who was voted "Most Bizarre" and "Most Likely to Be Arrested" in high school, ponders. "Would it have been a bigger deal if shame had been attached to it and all those things that become huge life-altering issues for youngsters in that situation? It's possible that my attitude around it came, on some level, from knowing that I still liked boys." Anderson Cooper, 2012 Anderson Cooper's sexuality had been scrutinized for years but it wasn't until July 2012 that he finally addressed the issue when he came out in an email to his friend and fellow journalist, Andrew Sullivan, this summer. In Cooper's message, which was posted on Sullivan's blog, "The Dish," on The Daily Beast, the CNN anchor states, "The fact is, I'm gay, always have been, always will be, and I couldn?t be any more happy, comfortable with myself, and proud." Lana Wachowski, 2012 Award-winning filmmaker Lana Wachowski, who's best known for co-writing and -directing the "Matrix" trilogy with her brother, Andy Wachowski, is the first major Hollywood director to come out as transgender in July 2012. The Chicago native recently released "Cloud Atlas" and received the Human Rights Campaign's Visibility Award in October 2012, where she delivered a revealing and heartfelt speech (VIDEO). Zachary Quinto, 2011 Long rumored to be gay, the actor, most famous for his roles on "Heroes" and in the recent "Star Trek" film, came out in a October 2011 New York magazine profile, saying:
"In light of Jamey's [Rodemeyer] death -- it became clear to me in an instant that living a gay life without publicly acknowledging it -- is simply not enough to make any significant contribution to the immense work that lies ahead on the road to complete equality. Our society needs to recognize the unstoppable momentum toward unequivocal civil equality for every gay lesbian bisexual and transgendered citizen of this country."
Meredith Baxter, 2009 In December 2009 Baxter, most famous for playing Elyse Keaton on '80s sitcom "Family Ties," went on the "Today Show" and told Matt Lauer that she was a lesbian. Baxter said, "Some people would say, well, you're living a lie and, you know, the truth is -- not at all. This has only been for the past seven years." Frank Ocean, 2012 No mainstream black male hip-hop artist had ever come out until Frank Ocean did in July 2012, just before he debuted his first solo album, "Channel Orange." The singer-songwriter posted a Tumblr post which read, in part, "4 summers ago, I met somebody. I was 19. He was too. We spent that summer, and the summer after, together. Everyday almost. And on the days we were together, time would glide.? After that, Ocean received support from fellow hip-hop artists Jay-Z (and wife, Beyoncé), 50 Cent, Busta Rhymes and more. Daryl Hannah, director of media and community partnerships for the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation said, "[The support for Frank is] an extension of the overall kind of support we?re seeing across the country for LGBT people, and not just in a broad sense, but specifically from iconic members of the black community.? Wanda Sykes, 2008 The comedian and actress came out in November 2008 while speaking at an anti-Prop 8 rally in Las Vegas. Sykes said in part:
"I got married Oct. 25, I don't really talk about my sexual orientation, I felt like I was living my life, I wasn't in the closet, but I was just living my life. Everybody who knows me personally, they know I'm gay. And that's the way people should be able to live our lives, really. We shouldn't have to be standing out here demanding something we automatically should have as citizens of this country."
Matt Bomer, 2012 The 34-year-old "White Collar" hunk thanked his partner Simon Halls and his three children during Saturday's Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards, where he received the New Generation Arts and Activism Award for his work in the fight against HIV/AIDS. "I'd really especially like to thank my beautiful family: Simon, Kit, Walker, Henry," he told the crowd. "Thank you for teaching me what unconditional love is. You will always be my proudest accomplishment." Anne Burrell, 2012 "Secrets of a Restaurant Chef" host Anne Burrell confirmed she's a lesbian and in a committed relationship with a woman, just days after "Chopped" host Ted Allen made a reference to her sexuality in a radio interview. "Anne doesn't feel she was outed," Burrell's rep told Page Six. "She has made no secret of her relationship." The rep went on to note, "Her significant other is a very private woman. They have been together for a couple of years and spend a lot of time together." Adam Lambert, 2009 The singer's sexuality was always a topic of discussion for viewers when he was performing on "American Idol," but Lambert didn't come out until after the competition had wrapped. In a June 2009 Rolling Stone cover story, Lambert said, "Right after the finale [of "AI"], I almost started talking about it to the reporters, but I thought, 'I'm going to wait for Rolling Stone, that will be cooler,'.. I didn't want the Clay Aiken thing and the celebrity-magazine bullshit. I need to be able to explain myself in context." Jim Parsons, 2012 New York Times scribe Patrick Healy confirmed "The Big Bang Theory" star's sexuality as part of a profile. The revelation came late in the article, when Healy describes the 39-year-old actor's role in the 2011 revival of Larry Kramer's HIV/AIDS crisis drama, "The Normal Heart." Wrote Healy: '"The Normal Heart" resonated with him on a few levels: Mr. Parsons is gay and in a 10-year relationship, and working with an ensemble again onstage was like nourishment, he said." Though the Times didn't identify Parsons' partner, he has been romantically liked with art director Todd Spiewak (pictured). Laura Jane Grace, 2012 Punk band Against Me!'s lead singer made headlines in May with the announcement that she is transgender and will be now known as Laura Jane Grace. The musician, who shared her story in Rolling Stone, said "For me, the most terrifying thing about this was how she [my wife, Heather] would accept the news. But she's been super-amazing and understanding." The couple has a 2-year-old daughter. Cynthia Nixon, 2004 The "Sex And The City" star was out-ed in 2004 when the NY Daily News and the New York Post reported she was living with another woman in September 2004. Nixon half-heartedly confirmed the rumors when she told the Daily News, "My private life is private... But at the same time, I have nothing to hide. So what I will say is that I am very happy." Sam Champion, 2012 ABC's "Good Morning America" weatherman, Sam Champion,, not only came out of the closet in October 2012, he also announced his engagement to longtime boyfriend, Rubem Robierb, at the same time. The New York Times subtly mentioned the news in an article about MSNBC personality Thomas Roberts' recent wedding, where Champion and Robierb were guests. After his revelation, Champion, 51, discussed about his plans on "GMA" and thanked everyone for their support (see video clip). Kelly McGillis, 2009 Kelly McGillis, known as who starred opposite Tom Cruise in "Top Gun," revealed she's gay on lesbian website SheWired.com. McGillis, who was married twice to men and has two daughters, said, "It's a part of being true to yourself. That's been a challenge for me personally." Chris Colfer, 2009 The "Glee" actor came out on the "Chelsea Lately Show" in December 2009: Chelsea Handler: "Your character on the show's gay. We know that you're gay. That's good for you. Congratulations. Don't be shy about that. Seriously. You shouldn't be shy about that because every time...an actor like you is helping a zillion other people that are scared to talk about their sexuality so good for you." Chris Colfer: "Thank you. You know what my answer to that question was prior to coming out -- was that I was straight as every other actor in Hollywood." Ezra Miller, 2012 Breakout, up-and-coming actor Ezra Miller, who stars in "The Perks of Being a Wallflower," came out as queer in an interview with Out magazine in August. The 20-year-old actor, who's also known for his big screen roles on "City Island" and "We Need To Talk About Kevin," told Out: "I have a lot of really wonderful friends who are of very different sexes and genders. I am very much in love with no one in particular." Sara Gilbert, 2010 Sara Gilbert, who's best known for her role on "Roseanne," officially came out in 2010. At that time, she was getting ready to launch "The Talk," a daytime talk show which focuses on parenthood and families, so Gilbert felt compelled to acknowledge her sexuality. ?I don?t ever really think of things as out or in,? Gilbert said. ?I just think I am who I am, and when topics come up that are appropriate, I?ll talk about them and share when it seems right.? Chaz Bono, 2009 Chaz Bono revealed his plan to transition in May 2009. TMZ.com broke the story via a prepared statement from Bono's publicist that read, in part:
"Yes, it's true -- Chaz, after many years of consideration, has made the courageous decision to honor his true identity... He is proud of his decision and grateful for the support and respect that has already been shown by his loved ones. It is Chaz's hope that his choice to transition will open the hearts and minds of the public regarding this issue, just as his 'coming out' did nearly 20 years ago."
Andrew Rannells, 2012 Andrew Rannells has had a stellar year. Since nabbing a Tony nomination for Best Leading Actor in a Musical for the Broadway blockbuster "The Book of Mormon," Rannells went on to star in HBO's "Girls" and ABC's "The New Normal." In November, the 34 year old was named to Out magazine's prestigious "OUT100" list. ?I feel very proud to be a part of The New Normal,? Rannells told Out. ?I hope that it?s considered to be a part of the evolution of gay relationships on television. Coming from Nebraska, it?s exciting to me that people I went to grade school with, people that I grew up going to church with, are watching the show.? Joanna Johnson, 2012 "Bold and the Beautiful" star Joanna Johnson became daytime soap opera's only active "out" actor when she said she was a lesbian in May. Johnson said she feared coming out would prohibit her from getting acting roles. Johnson told TV Guide in an exclusive interview that she's married to L.A. club promoter Michelle Agnew, with whom she has two children, five-year-old Julian and Harlow, who is two. George Michael, 1998 After being caught performing a "lewd act" in a public restroom, Michael came out to CNN in April 1998. Michael said, "This is as good of a time as any... I want to say that I have no problem with people knowing that I'm in a relationship with a man right now. I have not been in a relationship with a woman for almost 10 years." Later that year Michael spoofed the incident in the music video for his single "Outside." Don Lemon, 2011 The CNN news anchor came out to the New York Times in May 2011. Lemon told the paper, "It's quite different for an African-American male... It's about the worst thing you can be in black culture. You're taught you have to be a man; you have to be masculine. In the black community they think you can pray the gay away." Todd Glass, 2012 Comedian Todd Glass came out in January in an episode of the "WTF with Marc Maron" podcast. Glass cited the slew of LGBT teen suicides as his impetus for coming out. He told Maron: "I cannot listen to stories about kids killing themselves any longer without thinking [to myself], 'When are you going to have a little blood on your shirt for not being honest about who you are?'" Rosie Pierri, 2012 Everyone loves Rosie. In a June episode of "The Real Housewives of New Jersey," Rosie Pierri candidly came out to her sister, Kathy Wakile, a main cast member, proclaiming, "God made me this way. That's it." Pierri spoke with The Huffington Post in May before the episode aired and shared that she was a "late bloomer," who didn't come to the realization until her 30s. Jonathan Knight, 2011 The New Kids On The Block singer was out-ed by fellow '80s teen pop star Tiffany in January 2011 when she revealed she dated Knight before "he became gay later." In response, Knight posted a message on his website stating in part:
"I have never been outed by anyone but myself! I did so almost twenty years ago. I never know that I would have to do it all over again publicly just because I reunited with NKOTB! I have lived my life very openly and have never hidden the fact that I am gay!"
Sean Maher, 2011 Sean Maher, known for his roles on "Firefly" and "Playboy Club," confirmed his sexuality in an Entertainment Weekly interview, saying, "This is my coming out ball. I?ve been dying to do this.? Ricky Martin, March 2010 In March 2009 pop star Ricky Martin posted a message on his website telling the world, "I am a fortunate homosexual man." Sean Hayes, 2010 Long dogged by rumors about his sexuality, the "Will and Grace" actor finally came out in The Advocate in April 2010: "I am who I am. I was never in, as they say. Never," he said. Lady Sovereign, 2010 In May 2010 the British rapper came out in Diva magazine. Sovereign said:
"Magazines would always ask about it but [questions about my sexuality] would get stopped by my publicists. It was my choice, too, because I was a bit worried about it but now I don't really give a shit. You can't hide away forever. It's just stupid and now I've come out I feel a lot more comfortable with myself. But it was a bit scary back then because some people do have horrible opinions."
T.R. Knight, 2007 T.R. Knight's coming out wasn't necessarily ideal. The actor, who played George O'Malley on ABC's Grey's Anatomy, was called a "faggot" by co-star Isaiah Washington, prompting Knight to stand up for himself and others. He told Ellen DeGeneres, "I've never been called that to my face. So I think when that happened, something shifted, and it became bigger than myself." Kristy McNichol, 2012 People magazine reported In January 2012 that Kristy McNichol, who was beloved for playing Buddy Lawrence in the '70s show "Family," for which she won an Emmy, and later Barbara Weston on the "Golden Girls" spin-off "Empty Nest," revealed she is a lesbian because she is "approaching 50" and wants to "be open about who I am." McNichol also cited the wave of antigay bullying stories for coming out, hoping to help bullied LGBT youth who need support. Benji Schwimmer, 2012 After Benji Schwimmer won the second season of Fox's long-running hit series "So You Think You Can Dance," the 28-year-old dancer-choreographer became somewhat of a Mormon rockstar. But in a tell-all, five-hour interview for "Mormon Stories," Schwimmer came out and discussed at length his homosexuality and the church's views on the issue. He spoke with Out magazine in June and said: "I get at least 10 emails a day from kids that say, I was going to kill myself, and I heard something in the podcast that rang true to me, and I?m holding on. For that validation alone?it?s nice that Perez Hilton and Out are covering this, but just that personal touch is what it?s about. For the last year, I didn?t hide it. I held hands with a boyfriend in the streets. I kissed him in bars?in straight bars. I don?t give a fuck." Clay Aiken, 2008 After becoming a father in August of 2008, the "American Idol" runner up came out on the cover of People magazine in September 2008 saying, "[Coming out] was the first decision I made as a father... I cannot raise a child to lie or to hide things. I wasn't raised that way, and I'm not going to raise a child to do that." Orlando Cruz, 2012 History was made in October when active professional featherweight boxer Orlando Cruz of Puerto Rico came out. He said in a USA Today article, "I've been fighting for more than 24 years and as I continue my ascendant career, I want to be true to myself. I want to try to be the best role model I can be for kids who might look into boxing as a sport and a professional career." He continued, "I have and will always be a proud Puerto Rican. I have always been and always will be a proud gay man." Chely Wright, 2010 Country singer Chely Wright came out in May 2010. She told People magazine, "There had never, ever been a country music artist who had acknowledged his or her homosexuality... I wasn't going to be the first." But she changed her mind and said of her decision, "Nothing in my life has been more magical than the moment I decided to come out." Mika, 2012 The flamboyant singer-songwriter played coy about his sexuality for many years before finally coming out as gay in the September 2012 issue of Instinct magazine. Mika told the magazine:
"If you ask me am I gay, I say yeah... Are these songs about my relationship with a man? I say yeah. And it?s only through my music that I?ve found the strength to come to terms with my sexuality beyond the context of just my lyrics. This is my real life."
Lance Bass, 2006 The 'N Sync pop star came out on the cover of People magazine in July 2006. When asked why he decided to come out then, Bass said, "The main reason I wanted to speak my mind was that (the rumors) really were starting to affect my daily life. Now it feels like it's on my terms. I'm at peace with my family, my friends, myself and God so there's really nothing else that I worry about." Denise Ho, 2012 Hong Kong's fourth annual LGBT Pride Parade in November saw beloved Cantonese pop star Denise Ho come out as a lesbian. This announcement made her the first mainstream female singer in Hong Kong to say she's gay, according to several Hong Kong media outlets. "As a celebrity, I think I have an obligation, a duty to stand forward for the sake of love and equality," the 35-year-old singer told the crowd. Amber Heard, 2010 "I personally think that if you deny something or if you hide something you're inadvertently admitting it's wrong. I don't feel like I'm wrong," said actress Amber Heard, 26, who came out while attending GLAAD's 25th anniversary party. Heard has starred in movies like as "Pineapple Express" and "Zombieland." Elton John, 1976 In an interview with Rolling Stone in October 1976, the rock star came out by saying, "There's nothing wrong with going to bed with somebody of your own sex. I think everybody's bisexual to a certain degree. I don't think it's just me. It's not a bad thing to be. I think you're bisexual. I think everybody is." Suze Orman, 2007 Financial guru Suze Orman came out in a 2007 New York Times Magazine article. The 61-year-old Chicago native was asked if she was married in the interview, which prompted her to officially come out and set the record straight (so to speak). David Hyde Pierce, 2007 "Frasier" actor David Hyde Pierce kept a low profile and subtly came out in an article on CNN where he mentioned his longtime partner, TV writer and producer Brian Hargrove. Later, while on "The View", Pierce spoke about Hargrove and his sexuality and said,"What you choose to talk about yourself is a personal decision." Neil Patrick Harris, 2006 The "Doogie Howser, MD" and "How I Met Your Mother Star" came out on the cover of People magazine in November of 2006. Harris told the magazine:
"The public eye has always been kind to me, and until recently I have been able to live a pretty normal life. Now it seems there is speculation and interest in my private life and relationships. So, rather than ignore those who choose to publish their opinions without actually talking to me, I am happy to dispel any rumors or misconceptions and am quite proud to say that I am a very content gay man living my life to the fullest and feel most fortunate to be working with wonderful people in the business I love."
Darren Hayes, 2006 The former Savage Garden front man came out by marrying Richard Cullen in June 2006. He announced the civil union on his website saying in part: "As so many of you have given me your heart and soul over the past 10 years I thought it only fitting that I too return the respect and inform you of the most significant event in my life... On June 19th 2006 I married my boyfriend of two years, Richard, in a Civil Partnership ceremony in London." George Takei, 2005 The beloved George Takei, known as Sulu on "Star Trek," came out in a 2005 article in Frontiers, a biweekly LGBT Los Angeles magazine. Takei, 75, cited the political landscape surrounding LGBT issues as one reason for coming out. Since then, Takei has been an outspoken (and humorous) advocate for LGBT rights. Portia de Rossi, 2005 The actress had been out to friends for quite some time, but she told the entire world in the fall of 2005 in interviews with Details magazine and The Advocate. "I've had my years of being not open, many years of it... It's an honor for me to do this; it's just nice to be asked," de Rossi said in her September 2005 Advocate cover story, her first with the gay press. Heather Matarazzo, 2004 The actress, perhaps best known for her role as tormented teen Dawn Wiener in the film "Welcome To The Dollhouse," came out in August 2004 by telling the NY Daily News about falling in love with Caroline Murphy:
"I met the person I'm so madly crazy in love with...She's not famous yet. She will be. She wants to do musical theater and stage, which is not as demoralizing as the movie business is."
Rosie O'Donnell, 2002 The comedian and talk show host came out by revealing "I'm a dyke!" during her stand up act at the Ovarian Cancer Research benefit at Carolines Comedy Club in February 2002. Nathan Lane, 1999 The hilarious Nathan Lane, who's well known for starring in films like "The Birdcage," officially came out in an interview with The Advocate in 1999. In the issue, the 56-year-old Emmy- and Tony-winner said, "It's never been something I kept a secret." But Matthew Shepard's murder led the actor to publicly coming out. "It was like somebody slapped me awake," Lane said. "At this point it's selfish not to do whatever you can." Contribute to this Story:
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/19/anderson-cooper-comic-book-_n_3461221.html?utm_hp_ref=books&ir=Books

THE STORY OF FISH AND SNAIL

11:36, 14/6/2013 .. 0 comments .. Link
KIRKUS REVIEW Right from the title page, Freedman?s latest makes a splash. Atop a black-and-white stack of closed books sits one open book with blue pages fluttering like waves. A yellow fishtail disappears into the page, splashing water into the air above the books. This book happens to be a watery world (fish tank?) where, every day, Snail waits for Fish ?to come home with a story.? Fish offers one with ?a whole ocean, and a secret treasure, and a pirate ship??but rather than telling it, ?I want to show you this time, Snail!? Nope?Snail won?t go. They fight; Fish departs. Highlighted against the closed books and unobtrusive, black-and-white bookshelves in the background, Fish and Snail?s watercolor world looks clear and fine. But with Fish gone, ?[h]ow can this be The Story of Fish & Snail?? Snail peers downward over the edge of the towering pile of books, where Fish has disappeared with a quiet ?plimp.? Fish?s body, far below, appears murkily underwater inside the daunting new book. ?F-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-S-H!? cries Snail, launching bravely into the air. Water splashes the whole height of the pile as Snail plunges into the new book. Fish peeps around a page?s corner, ready for reconciliation and adventure. Texture, scale and angle accentuate the exciting difference between the in-book worlds and the pale library background. This marvelous metabook shines in both concept and beauty. (Picture book. 3-7) Pub Date: June 13th, 2013 ISBN: 978-0-670-78489-9
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/deborah-freedman/story-fish-and-snail/

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