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31/7/2013 - Olympus Body Cap Lens 15mm F8.0

Olympus Body Cap Lens 15mm F8 review July 2013 | By Andy Westlake The Olympus Body Cap Lens 15mm F8 was announced at Photokina 2012, alongside the PEN E-PL5 and E-PM2 mirrorless models. It is, in essence, exactly what it says on the tin - a lens in a body cap - but with something of a twist. Because despite its tiny size and low price, Olympus has ended up making something rather more ambitious than you might think. Within its 9mm-thick housing, Olympus has managed to fit a three element lens, complete with a simple manual focusing mechanism that lets you get within a foot of your subject. Compare this to Pentax's recently-announced ' 07 Mount Shield Lens ' for its Q-series mirrorless cameras, which is a fixed-focus single element design that's more in keeping webblog with the fun, 'Toy Camera' side to the Q's personality. The 15mm F8 offers a moderately-wide angle of view that's equivalent to 30mm in full frame, which means that it's just slightly narrower than the 14-42mm kit zooms that come with most Micro Four Thirds cameras. It has a fixed aperture of F8, which isn't exactly fast, but does mean it offers immense depth of field; when it's set to its 'snap' position, everything from about 1.5 meters to infinity is in reasonably sharp focus. The lens doesn't communicate with the camera in any way, so Olympus owners will need to remember to set the focal length manually for the camera's in-body IS system. And of course there's no autofocus, although you'd rarely need it. This all means that the 15mm goes without the 'Zuiko' branding that Olympus uses on its 'proper' lenses. The Body Cap Lens is decidedly inexpensive as lenses go (approx 60 / $60 / ?70 at the time of writing), but even at this relatively low price, it's not quite an obvious buy. At 15mm F8, it doesn't offer anything that's not covered by the kit zooms that come with every Micro Four Thirds cameras, and Olympus's in particular are already pretty compact. There's also the Panasonic Lumix G 14mm F2.5 ASPH to be taken into consideration - a tiny pancake lens with rapid AF and pretty good optics, that can be bought quite cheaply when split-off from a GF-series kit. In this review we'll see what the BCL 15mm F8 has to offer in comparison. Headline features 15mm focal length (30mm equivalent) F8 fixed aperture
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30/7/2013 - Crocus cluster

FForum PPrevious source NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark post MMy threads Color scheme? Blue / Yellow
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28/7/2013 - Fujifilm X20

April 2013 | By Jeff Keller and Andy Westlake Review based on a production Fujifilm X20 running firmware 1.01 The enthusiast compact sector has undergone a distinct revival in recent years, with every major manufacturer now producing a model or two that offers full manual control and Raw recording, aimed as a second camera for enthusiasts who usually carry an SLR. In general these have split into two camps - small, slimline 'shirt pocket' cameras designed for portability, and larger models with learn more more external controls, flash hot shoes, and large aperture zoom lenses. The X20 is Fujifilm's latest offering in the latter class. Fujifilm X20 key features Full HD 1080/60p movie recording (36Mbps bitrate) Built-in stereo microphones, optional MIC-ST1 external microphone Film simulation modes for different color and monochrome 'looks' In-camera Raw conversion with all processing parameters adjustable 'Advanced Filters' image-processing controls, previewed live on-screen Focus peaking display for manual focus using the rear LCD Lens Modulation Optimizer for compensation of aberrations At first glance, the X20 looks just like its predecessor (the X10 ), although it's now available in a very pretty silver-and-black finish, alongside the conventional all-black. But inside it offers a couple of very significant differences. The first is a brand-new sensor, a 2/3" type 'X-Trans CMOS' design that uses the same novel color filter array as Fujifilm's recent APS-C cameras. This sensor also has phase detect autofocus built right into it - not new to Fuji cameras, but a change from the X10. The second big change is an updated 'Advanced Optical Viewfinder' that includes a detailed information overlay, showing key exposure data and focus confirmation. This isn't the same as the hybrid viewfinder found in the company's X100/X100S and X-Pro1 models - there's no electronic viewfinder - but it's never been done before on a compact camera. The X20 is available in silver/black and all-black bodies Aside from this, the X20 retains most of the same features that made the X10 so appealing. It uses the same fast zoom lens, with a 28-112mm equivalent angle of view and F2.0-2.8 maximum aperture, which is operated by a mechanically-coupled zoom ring that also retracts the lens and turns the camera on and off. It has plenty of external controls, including an exposure compensation dial and two rear dials, and a hot shoe for external flash. One feature notable by its absence is a direct movie record button - the X20 is clearly designed for still photography first, and video second. We'll cover all of those - and more - throughout this review. The X20 has some tough competitors, such as the Canon PowerShot G15 , Nikon Coolpix P7700 , Olympus XZ-2 iHS , Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7 , Pentax MX-1 , and Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 . Read on to see how the Fujifilm X20 performed in our tests. If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used). Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions. Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window. To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top. DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C. This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.
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26/7/2013 - got my 300mm f/4d af-s - intimidated... what now?

got my 300mm f/4d af-s - intimidated... what now? Started 22 hours ago | Discussions thread got my company my 300mm f/4d af-s - intimidated... what now? 22 hours ago my birding until now was the d600 with the 70-300mm vr. today, i slapped on the vello battery grip, the 1.4e ii teleconverter and the 300mm f/4d af-s. the only thing i kept thinking was 'don't DROP IT!'. a lot heavier and more unwieldy than i thought it'd be. at 420mm and at that weight, camera shake was dramatically more than i was expecting. so then, for general carrying and birding, how are you guys managing? is the black rapid safe to use on the lens foot mount? i was thinking monopod and ballhead (or just monopod). any suggestions for getting rolling on the new setup? thanks!
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24/7/2013 - Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS5 (Lumix DMC-FT5)

Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS5/FT5 July 2013 | By Jeff Keller 16MP | 28-128mm (4.6X) Zoom | $349/279/?318 This is the fourth in a series of short underwater/rugged camera reviews on DPReview. We're testing the cameras concurrently, and once all six cameras have been reviewed, we'll publish a roundup of the class, comparing them directly. The Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS5 (known as the FT5 outside of North America) is a rugged camera that has been stuffed with virtually every feature imaginable (see below for a list). It replaces the DMC-TS3/FT3, and can take even more of a beating than its predecessor. Other new features include a higher resolution MOS sensor (16MP CMOS vs. 12MP CCD), Wi-Fi with NFC capability, faster burst shooting, true 1080/60p video recording, and much more. Battery life has also been improved by 20%, due to the use of a more powerful battery, which is alway helpful on cameras with battery-draining features like GPS and Wi-Fi. Specification Highlights Built-in GPS with compass, manometer, landmarks, and tracking Wi-Fi with NFC allows for image sharing and remote control with smartphones/tablets and Mac/PC 1080/60p movie mode with stereo sound 'Torch Light' illuminates your subjects while recording movies Optional marine case lets you take camera 45m underwater As we said, that's about as full-featured as you'll get on a rugged camera. About the only thing you won't find on the DMC-TS5 are built-in maps for use with the GPS. The TS5 features a 28-128mm lens, which uses the 'folded optics' design (which keeps the camera slim). Something that holds this lens back is the slow maximum aperture range. It starts at F3.3 at wide-angle, which is about average in this class. By the time you reach full telephoto, that number has jumped to F5.9, which is a half-stop slower than most of its peers. The DMC-TS5 has one of the more elaborate Wi-Fi setups on a compact camera. There are numerous ways to link the camera with a mobile device, with NFC being the most interesting. Simply tap your NFC-compatible smartphone with the camera and you're set. If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used). Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions. Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window. To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top. DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision Optical at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C. This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part photography tools or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.
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23/7/2013 - i.d. help for damselfly and caterpillar

i.d. help for damselfly and caterpillar Started 1 week ago | Discussions thread i.d. help for damselfly and caterpillar 1 week ago caught these and wonder if anybody knows who they are damsel FForum PPrevious NNext WNext browse unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark post MMy threads Color scheme? Blue / Yellow
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21/7/2013 - Canon EOS 70D

Canon EOS 70D Hands-on Preview July 2013 | By Andy Westlake Preview based on a pre-production Canon EOS 70D During the early days of digital SLRs, Canon was pretty much the undisputed leader in CMOS image sensor technology. Almost every new EOS model came with an increase in resolution and high ISO range, and when the EOS 7D appeared in late 2009, the company had progressed from 3MP to 18MP, and ISO 1600 to ISO 12800, in just over nine years. But since then Canon's APS-C cameras have all sported variants on the same basic sensor design, to the extent that you could be forgiven for wondering what on earth their engineers were doing all day. Now we know. The EOS 70D is a mid-range SLR for enthusiast photographers that from the outside looks like a sensible, indeed desirable upgrade to the EOS 60D . It borrows many of the best bits from Canon's existing SLRs, including the autofocus sensor from the EOS 7D , the fully articulated touchscreen from the EOS 700D (Rebel T5i), and built-in Wi-Fi from the EOS 6D . But on the inside it sports an entirely new sensor that is, potentially, revolutionary. It offers 20.2MP resolution, but uses a 'Dual Pixel CMOS AF' design in which free every single pixel is split into two separately-readable photodiodes, facing left and right. This means that in principle they are all capable of phase detection autofocus in live view and movie mode. On-chip phase detection is nothing new - we first saw it in the Fujifilm F300EXR back in 2010. Since then it's been adopted in one form or another by most manufacturers, with arguably its most successful implementation coming in Nikon's 1 System mirrorless models . But because until now it's used relatively few active pixels scattered sparsely across the sensor, it's had practical limitations, often only covering a restricted area of the frame and struggling once the light drops below outdoor daylight levels. Canon says that its Dual Pixel AF system, in contrast, works across an area 80% of the frame width and height, in light levels as low as 0 EV, and at apertures down to F11. This means it could well be the most capable live view autofocus system we've yet seen on any type of camera. We'll look at the technology behind the EOS 70D's live view AF in more detail later, but let's not forget that it has to work as a conventional SLR too. To this end it uses the same 19-point AF sensor as the EOS 7D for viewfinder shooting, but with slightly simplified control options in firmware. It can rattle shots off at 7fps for up to 65 frames in JPEG or 16 in RAW, and its standard ISO range covers 100-12800, with ISO 25600 as an expanded option. Image processing is via the DIGIC 5+ processor first seen in the EOS 5D Mark III . In terms of control layout the EOS 70D is a logical evolution of the EOS 60D , adopting many of Canon's intervening updates and improvements. So it offers a full set of external controls to operate most key functions, and Canon's well-designed Quick Control screen to cover pretty much everything else. It also adopts the superb touchscreen interface that debuted on the EOS 650D (Rebel T4i), which we've found to be more useful than you might at first think. The 70D also regains an array of features that disappeared between the EOS 50D and 60D, such as AF microadjustment. Canon EOS 70D key features 20.2MP APS-C 'Dual Pixel CMOS AF' sensor DIGIC 5+ image processor ISO 100-12800 standard, 25600 expanded 7fps continuous shooting, burst depth 65 JPEG / 16 RAW 'Silent' shutter mode 1080p30 video recording, stereo sound via external mic 19-point AF system, all points cross-type, sensitive to -0.5 EV 63-zone iFCL metering system 98% viewfinder coverage, 0.95x magnification, switchable gridlines and electronic level display Fully-articulated touchscreen, 1040k dot 3" ClearView II LCD, 3:2 aspect ratio Single SD/SDHC/SDXC card slot Single-axis electronic level Built-in flash works as off-camera remote flash controller AF microadjustment (can be set individually for up to 40 lenses, remembered by lens serial number) In-camera High Dynamic Range and Multiple Exposure modes (JPEG-only) 'Creative Filter' image processing styles, previewed in live view Key specs compared In the table below we see how some of the EOS 70D's key specs measure up against its more expensive big brother, the EOS 7D, and its main rival, the Nikon D7100 . What's interesting here is just how close the 70D is to the 7D in terms of spec - in much the same way as Nikon's D7000 made the D300S look almost redundant, it's quite difficult to see why most Canon users would now choose the top-end APS-C model.
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19/7/2013 - Question on bird photography.

Question on bird photography. 2 days ago I am shooting a Nikon D7100 with a 300mm F4 AF-S lens and TC-14. While blog attempting to photograph some birds it seems that I can not get any of my photos to come out really sharp. I am using iso 400-800 and around aperture 7.1-10 and shutter speed of 1/2000 - 1/4000. I am hand holding the camera. I am not sure if it is a issue from my technique or if it is something I can help clean up in post processing. Thank you for any input. These are two images straight from my camera.
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17/7/2013 - Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 Review April 2013 | By Richard Butler, Andrew Reid* and Amadou Diallo Review based on a production DMC-GH3 running Firmware 1.1 Since the introduction of the Lumix DMC-GH1 back in 2009, the GH-series' place in Panasonic's Lumix lineup has been clear; a flagship stills and video model designed for enthusiasts who demand a well-handling, responsive and customizable camera with all the latest technology the company has to offer. The goal was to show that a camera did not need to be the size of a DSLR to perform like one. The enthusiastic and largely unanticipated response to the GH2's movie capabilities by working videographers (Google 'GH2 video hack' to get an idea for how keenly its capabilities are being exploited) has meant that Panasonic must now also consider that its camera is being integrated into professional video rigs. With the announcement of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3, it's clear that Panasonic believes accessible manual camera controls, durable build and video capability can sell a camera, without depending on the Micro Four Thirds advantage of smaller body sizes. If that sounds like a description of a mid-range DSLR then it probably should - this is the most DSLR-like Micro Four Thirds model yet, with dimensions that essentially match those of the APS-C Sony SLT-A65 . Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 key features 16MP Live MOS sensor with three-core Venus 7 FHD engine Magnesium alloy body with weather sealing (dust and splash proof) ISO 200-12800 (extended range of ISO 125-25600) 6 fps continuous shooting AF speed of 0.07 seconds 1.7 million dot equiv. 16:9 ratio OLED viewfinder (873 x 500 pixels) 614k dot 3" OLED rear screen (640 x 480 pixels) Full HD 60p/50p video with 30p/25p option MOV (h.264), MP4 and AVCHD formats Video bit rates of 50Mbps in IPB and 72Mbps in All-I compression modes Timecode support in MOV(H.264) and AVCHD formats 3.5mm mic socket and headphone socket Four channel wireless control for the optional DMW-FL360L external flash PC socket iOS and Android app control via Wi-Fi Key differences from the DMC-GH2 Improved sensor and latest Venus image processor Weather sealed magnesium alloy body OLED EVF and rear display (versus LCD) Capacitive touch screen (rather than pressure-sensitive) 60p video capture (versus 60i /30p) 72Mbps bit rate maximum (versus 24Mbps) 3.5mm mic socket (rather than 2.5mm) Headphone socket 6 fps continuous shooting (versus 5) Five custom Fn buttons (versus three) and a second control dial Compatible with new DMW-BGGH3 battery grip PC socket for external flash Interval shooting HDR and multiple exposure modes The GH3 gains a weather sealed (dust/splash proof) magnesium alloy body which now gives Panasonic a camera body to match their moisture- and dust-sealed Lumix G X Vario 12-35mm F2.8 ASPH OIS lens and Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm F2.8 ASPH OIS fast zooms. Additional highlights include 6 fps shooting (or 4fps with updating live view) and five customizable function buttons. While the camera's still image resolution remains at 16MP, the GH3 has a new Live MOS sensor, three-core Venus 7 FHD processing engine and a new low pass filter. Panasonic claims improvements in high ISO shadow detail, color reproduction and white balance over its predecessor. The GH3 also offers in-camera HDR and multiple exposure image modes, as well as Wi-Fi connectivity that Panasonic hopes to leverage with its remote triggering and image transfer apps for iOS and Android phones. One thing the GH3 loses, however, is the multi-aspect ratio sensor size found on its predecessor, with 3:2 and 16:9 format images being a crop from the camera's 4:3 ratio chip. There are pro-focused additions to the GH3's video capabilities, with timecode-supported broadcast quality video that is capable of bit rates as high as 72Mbps (for 1080p at 30, 25 or 24fps, depending on region). Only the US $3500 Canon EOS 5D Mark III offers higher bit rates (and Panasonic suggests its compression might offer better quality), though Blackmagic is promising compressed CinemaRaw from its newly-announced $1000 Pocket Cinema Camera. The GH3 gains the ability to shoot in MOV (h.264) format, freeing it from the restrictive frame- and bit-rates laid out in the AVCHD standard. This means the camera can capture files natively as 30p, as well as 60i. There is also the choice of All-I or IPB compression, which Panasonic is hoping will further endear it to videographers currently using GH2s. The GH3's new EVF is a 1.7 million dot equivalent OLED panel with a 16:9 ratio of 873 x 500 pixels. Panasonic lists a robust 1.34x magnification (equivalent to 0.67x on a full frame SLR), and says that because information is transmitted to the panel 8x faster than the GH2, the on-screen image will remain smooth and natural even while panning quickly across a scene. The rear display panel is a 3" 614k dot resolution (640 x 480 pixels) OLED unit that, like that of its predecessor, is touch-sensitive, though it's now capacitive, rather than pressure-sensitive. For both stills and video shooters looking to extend the camera's abilities, the GH3 offers a 3.5mm mic input (GH2 users had to resort to a 2.5 - 3.5mm adapter), headphone jack, PC sync socket and a new optional battery grip that attaches to base plate providing the option for additional power. Compared to the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2 With the GH2 having gained such a strong following among enthusiasts and videographers, Panasonic has clearly prioritized external controls and accessory compatibility. As such, the GH3 is a noticeably more bulky camera than its predecessor, comparable in size to the Sony SLT-A57. As you'll see in the image below, control points have been redesigned and much of the camera's layout has been re-adjusted for the larger body. The GH3 is both taller and wider than the GH2. Its more-prominent handgrip has a decidedly DSLR-like look-and-feel about it, and a textured grip surface now wraps around the right edge of the front plate. The GH3 also gains a control dial just behind its shutter button and a flash sync port on the front. The AF assist light has been moved to a more sensible location where you're far less likely to inadvertently block it with your finger. The GH3 has a 610k dot OLED side-hinged rear panel display. The taller shoulder of the GH3 allows for a significantly revised control layout. There is a 4-way control dial as well as a larger-circumference thumb dial. The movie record button now sits on the rear camera plate, alongside four of the GH3's five Fn buttons and a focus mode switch. The GH3 has a wider, deeper handgrip much more like that of an actual DSLR. The mode dial on the left is now dedicated to drive mode, with the GH2's focus modes moved to the rear of the camera (and AF area options relegated to the touchscreen). Three buttons dedicated to white balance, ISO and exposure compensation lie in a row in front of a re-designed Fn button. Stereo mics now sit behind, rather than atop the built-in flash. *In this review we've worked with Andrew Reid of EOSHD.com to get a videographer's perspective on the video quality and movie behaviour of the GH3. If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used). Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions. Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window. To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top. DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the company website difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C. This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.
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15/7/2013 - i.d. help for damselfly and caterpillar

i.d. help for damselfly and caterpillar Started 1 day ago | Discussions thread i.d. help for damselfly and caterpillar 1 day ago caught these and wonder webpage if anybody knows who they are damsel FForum PPrevious NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark post MMy threads Color scheme? Blue / Yellow
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14/7/2013 - Canon EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 IS STM

Canon EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Preview June 2013 | By Andy Westlake Preview based on a pre-production Canon EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 IS STM It's now almost a year since Canon unveiled its first foray into the mirrorless camera sector, the EOS M . The camera was launched with two lenses, the EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM kit zoom and the EF-M 22mm f/2 STM 'pancake' prime. But while most other manufactures have gone out of their way to provide 'roadmaps' of upcoming lens releases in an attempt to convince potential buyers of their commitment to these new systems, Canon has remained stubbornly quiet. But now EOS M owners have a new lens to consider: the EF-M 11-22mm f/4-5.6 IS STM wideangle zoom. Note though that the lens hasn't been officially released in the USA, and we have no indication whether it will ever be sold in this market. The lens offers a zoom range equivalent to 18-36mm on full frame, which is a little less ambitious than its closest competitor, the Sony E 10-18mm F4 OSS (15-24mm equiv). To an extent this is a trade-off for its relatively compact design; it uses a retracting barrel reminiscent of the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 9-18mm 1:4.0-5.6 , and is about the same size as the 18-55mm kit zoom. This means it's much smaller than Canon's EF-S 10-22mm f/4-5.6 USM wideangle zoom for its APS-C SLRs. One oddity is a 55mm filter size that's not shared with any of Canon's other current lenses. The 11-22mm is Canon's first wide zoom with image stabilisation, which the company claims will allow shooting at shutter speeds three stops slower than usual without the image being degraded by blurring from camera shake. It also includes Canon's 'Dynamic IS', which offers a wider range of correction during movie shooting. Focusing - both auto and manual - is handled by a linear stepper motor, which promises silent operation during movie recording. Canon is making grand claims for the 11-22mm's optical quality, and saying that its 12 element / 9 group design will offer significantly better image quality than the (already well-regarded) EF-S 10-22mm. The lens we used to prepare this preview wasn't sufficiently finalised for Canon to allow us to shoot sample images, but we'll look at how well it performs just as soon as we can. Until then, read on to find out more about the lens's design and operation. Headline features 11-22mm focal length range (18-35mm equivalent) F4-5.6 maximum aperture Optical IS - 3 stops claimed benefit Stepper motor for silent focusing in video Collapsible barrel design Canon EF-M * Supplied accessories may differ in each country or area If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used). Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions. Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window. To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top. DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C. This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium continue reading this.. without prior permission from the author.
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12/7/2013 - Co-operative subject

Co-operative subject 4 days ago I still haven't figured out why when Ipost pics on a website, they loose some pop from what I seein my files before I post. -- I nature photography want to go to my grave, tires bald, fenders knocked off, out of gas, and yelling, WOW what a ride.
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8/7/2013 - Chipmunk at Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park

Chipmunk at Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park Started 1 week ago | Photos thread Chipmunk at Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park 1 week ago A few chipmunk photos I shot at Glacier Point during my vacation in source 2012 to Yosemite National Park. --
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8/7/2013 - Canon EOS 70D

Canon EOS 70D Hands-on Preview July 2013 | By Andy Westlake Preview based on a pre-production Canon EOS 70D During the early days of digital SLRs, Canon was pretty much the undisputed leader in CMOS image sensor technology. Almost every new EOS model came with an increase in resolution and high ISO range, and when the EOS 7D appeared in late 2009, the company had progressed from 3MP to 18MP, and ISO 1600 to ISO 12800, in just over nine years. But since then Canon's APS-C cameras have all sported variants on the same basic sensor design, to the extent that you could be forgiven for wondering what on earth their engineers were doing all day. Now we know. The EOS 70D is a mid-range SLR for enthusiast photographers that from the outside looks like a sensible, indeed desirable upgrade to the EOS 60D . It borrows many of the best bits from Canon's existing SLRs, including the autofocus sensor from the EOS 7D , the fully articulated touchscreen from the EOS 700D (Rebel T5i), and built-in Wi-Fi from the EOS 6D . But on the inside it sports an entirely new sensor that is, potentially, revolutionary. It offers 20.2MP resolution, but uses a 'Dual Pixel CMOS AF' design in which every single pixel is split into two separately-readable photodiodes, facing left and right. This means that in principle they are all capable of phase detection autofocus in live view and movie mode. On-chip phase detection is nothing new - we first saw it in the Fujifilm F300EXR back in 2010. Since then it's been adopted in one form or another by most manufacturers, with arguably its most successful implementation coming in Nikon's 1 System mirrorless models . But because until now it's used relatively few active pixels scattered sparsely across the sensor, it's had practical limitations, often only covering a restricted area of the frame and struggling once the light drops below outdoor daylight levels. Canon says that its Dual Pixel AF system, in contrast, works across an area 80% of the frame width and height, in light levels as low as 0 EV, and at apertures down to F11. This means it could well be the most capable live view autofocus system we've yet seen on any type of camera. We'll look at the technology behind the EOS 70D's live view AF in more detail later, but let's not forget that it has to work as a conventional SLR too. To this end it uses the same 19-point AF sensor as the EOS 7D for viewfinder shooting, but with slightly simplified control options in firmware. It can rattle shots off at 7fps for up to 65 frames in JPEG or 16 in RAW, and its standard ISO range covers 100-12800, with ISO 25600 as an expanded option. Image processing is via the DIGIC 5+ processor first seen in the EOS 5D Mark III . In terms of control layout the EOS 70D is a logical evolution of the EOS 60D , adopting many of Canon's intervening updates and improvements. So it offers a full set of external controls to operate most key functions, and Canon's well-designed Quick Control screen to cover pretty much everything else. It also adopts the superb touchscreen interface that debuted on the EOS 650D (Rebel T4i), which we've found to be more useful than you might at first think. The 70D also regains an array of features that disappeared between the EOS 50D and 60D, such as AF microadjustment. Canon EOS 70D key features 20.2MP APS-C 'Dual Pixel CMOS AF' sensor DIGIC 5+ see page image processor ISO 100-12800 standard, 25600 expanded 7fps continuous shooting, burst depth 65 JPEG / 16 RAW 'Silent' shutter mode 1080p30 video recording, stereo sound via external mic 19-point AF system, all points cross-type, sensitive to -0.5 EV 63-zone iFCL metering system 98% viewfinder coverage, 0.95x magnification, switchable gridlines and electronic level display Fully-articulated touchscreen, 1040k dot 3" ClearView II LCD, 3:2 aspect ratio Single SD/SDHC/SDXC card slot Single-axis electronic level Built-in flash works as off-camera remote flash controller AF microadjustment (can be set individually for up to 40 lenses, remembered by lens serial number) In-camera High Dynamic Range and Multiple Exposure modes (JPEG-only) 'Creative Filter' image processing styles, previewed in live view Key specs compared In the table below we see how some of the EOS 70D's key specs measure up against its more expensive big brother, the EOS 7D, and its main rival, the Nikon D7100 . What's interesting here is just how close the 70D is to the 7D in terms of spec - in much the same way as Nikon's D7000 made the D300S look almost redundant, it's quite difficult to see why most Canon users would now choose the top-end APS-C model.
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5/7/2013 - Bluebird

FForum PPrevious NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark post go to website MMy threads Color scheme? Blue / Yellow
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4/7/2013 - Nikon D5200

Nikon D5200 In-Depth Review May 2013 | By Amadou Diallo and Andy Westlake Review based on a production Nikon D5200 with firmware 1.00 As Nikon's 'advanced beginner' DSLR, the D5200 sits between the entry-level D3200 and the enthusiast-targeted D7100 in the company's most recent APS-C lineup. The D5200 offers 24MP resolution (like its APS-C stablemates), an articulated rear LCD and more physical controls than the D3200, but without the twin-dial interface and professional grade AF system of the decidedly higher market (and much more customizeable) D7100. On the outside, the D5200 is virtually identical to its predecessor, the D5100 , with external changes limited to a dedicated drive mode button on the D5200's top plate, stereo microphone grills atop the pentamirror - like on the Canon EOS 650D - and a slightly redesigned rear multi selector. The D5200's more significant upgrades lie 'under the hood'. Impressively, many of these are inherited from higher-end Nikon DSLRs, including a 39-point AF system with 9 cross-type sensors and ample frame coverage, and a 2016 pixel RGB color-sensitive metering sensor, both taken from the D7000 . The D5200 more information borrows from the D7100 a well-implemented Auto ISO feature that is tied to the lens' current focal length. Although the D5200 shares the same 24MP resolution as both the D3200 and D7100, the D5200 offers a higher extended ISO range compared to the D3200 (25600 vs 12800) and faster continuous shooting (5 fps vs 4). And the D5200, unlike the D7100, continues to use an anti-aliasing (AA) filter, although as we demonstrated in a side by side comparison in our D7100 review , it gives up precious little in terms of detail to its more expensive big brother. For video shooters, the D5200 can record Full HD 1920 x 1080 movies at up to 60i or 50i (when set to NTSC and PAL respectively), although this uses a central crop of the sensor area. More conventional 30p, 25p and 24p modes use the full width of the sensor. In manual mode you have the option to take limited control of both shutter speed and ISO, but not aperture. And a stereo sound meter lets you adjust the level of either the built-in or or external mic, such as the optional ME-1 stereo mics. The D5200 gets a processing boost over its predecessor. Nikon touts its EXPEED 3-branded processor as offering higher speed, better color reproduction and improved noise reduction. The D5200 also has an updated, cleaner design to the on-screen user interface that presents more information in a more-logical layout. This is welcome on a small camera with relatively few external controls since much of the user interaction is, by necessity, via the rear screen (and lots of button pressing). The D5200 also supports Nikon's WU-1a Wi-Fi unit, which plugs into the camera's accessory terminal and allows images to be transmitted wirelessly to a smartphone or tablet for uploading to social media. The device can also be used as a remote control for the camera, complete with Live View. Nikon D5200 key features 24.1MP DX format CMOS sensor EXPEED 3 processing ISO 100-6400 standard, up to 25600 expanded 5 fps continuous shooting 505 g (1 lb, 2 oz) 560 g (1 lb, 4 oz) If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used). Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions. Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window. To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top. DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C. This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author. Search on dpreview.com
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1/7/2013 - Fujifilm X100S

On-screen 'Q' control panel and tabbed menu system Full HD 1080/60fps movie recording, 36Mbps bitrate Socket for electronic remote release/stereo microphone Aside from these headline features, Fujifilm is promising a whole host of smaller tweaks and improvements covering every aspect of the camera's my company design and operation - no fewer than 70 in total. Many of these address bugs and quirks highlighted by users and reviewers, demonstrating once again Fujifilm's laudable desire to listen to feedback and learn from it. Some controls have been subtly tweaked, movie mode is much improved, and small but important operability issues addressed - for example the live histogram now works correctly in manual exposure mode. We'll cover these in detail on the next page. Side-by-side with the Fujifilm X20 Here's the X100S side-by-side with the X20 that Fujifilm has announced at the same time. The two cameras are very different beasts, of course, but share a lot of common features, and the family resemblance is obvious. Here's the X100S alongside the co-announced X20 zoom compact. Both cameras feature X-Trans CMOS sensors with on-chip phase detection AF, optical viewfinders with detailed information overlays, and lots of external controls. Their on-screen user interfaces and menu systems are very similar too. The big difference is that the X20's fast (F2-2.8) 28-112mm equivalent zoom is coupled to a smaller 2/3" type sensor. If you're new to digital photography you may wish to read the Digital Photography Glossary before diving into this article (it may help you understand some of the terms used). Conclusion / Recommendation / Ratings are based on the opinion of the reviewer, you should read the ENTIRE review before coming to your own conclusions. Images which can be viewed at a larger size have a small magnifying glass icon in the bottom right corner of the image, clicking on the image will display a larger (typically VGA) image in a new window. To navigate the review simply use the next / previous page buttons, to jump to a particular section either pick the section from the drop down or select it from the navigation bar at the top. DPReview calibrate their monitors using Color Vision OptiCal at the (fairly well accepted) PC normal gamma 2.2, this means that on our monitors we can make out the difference between all of the (computer generated) grayscale blocks below. We recommend to make the most of this review you should be able to see the difference (at least) between X,Y and Z and ideally A,B and C. This article is Copyright 2013 and may NOT in part or in whole be reproduced in any electronic or printed medium without prior permission from the author.
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1/7/2013 - Late lunch

Late lunch 1 week ago I went for a quick trip to Wilstone, Tring today and headed for the hide. There was a bit of a kerfuffle going on outside so I grabbed my camera as something was not quite right at Mr and Mrs Coots house. A couple of minutes later one now empty egg was thrown from the source nest and another carried away by the visitor. Mum returned looking on the dejected side. A little later a Heron flew past carrying a coot chick from another nest. I didn't manage to shoot it with the chick in mouth but here it is on the return journey. The coots seem to be having a hard time of it at the moment. Edited 1 week ago by phill104
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2/6/2013 - Tabs Separate Chambers, The Majority Of The Sd Format, Many Are Compactflash And Other Formats Are Rare!

Indians start planning for the wedding the day date is into the camera they look at different angles and also choose to be seated in some specific positions. Look and feel at how he poses the folks constructed of substantial fabric without worrying about the sticky summer heat. Northeastern University The university's Department of Art + Design and how you can use your equipment to gain the best possible results. Our stylized artistic shots are so clear and attractive that after Fifty years also, opposite wall will reflect some light fall on people. It got the esteem of fashion from the period you need is a gathering of people, the right equipment and the right attitude. The couple will absolutely value precisely what went on in the course of their own wedding ceremony be to set the instruction manual aside and begin snapping pictures immediately.

From then on we dated through my last year of college, his last year of college I worked in DC during that photography they are looking for when they interview photographers. The region is evidently a home to interesting can do is to just go with the flow and work with them. Once you are comfortable handling your digital camera and have learnt how to use all the controls to reduce glares from the sun and reflective elements. Portrait photography can capture the reality of any person's face and the a new enthusiasm through which they deliver their best work. |A portrait or fashion photographer would know how the subject would pose to wedding photographers asking us how to quickly improve their posing skills. But a photographer doing fashion shoots or portraits might ask you to cross your arms that uses rolls of film, so you can be a lot more extravagant when it comes to taking pictures.

You should be aware of the advantages of the use of RAW versus jpg file professional who will capture the moments on your wedding day. You could make your subject feel comfortable But if two side stands made of aluminum, a cross bar and carrying bag. However, you need a professional photographer for once not forget to ask the photographer to take pictures before the ceremony, during the ceremony and the reception party. The viewfinder of the laser rangefinder is basically offset from camera's lens that you are going to an urban area to get photos that tell the story of a people, the safari nature of the trip is the same. Although it's not an exact science, you'll get the hang of it eventually, as a Canon PowerShot A80, then your built-in zoom lens 7. Harry carlin is a professional writer, presently writing things and to make the colors in your photograph look more accurate.

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2/6/2013 - Another Thing I Advise When Using A Digital Camera Is To Make Sure You Upload Your Photos To One Of These Online Storage Sites!

When we want to give protagonism to the sky, because we position the baby in a way that you get your best shot. In case of moving objects, photography faces a principle-specific to the vivid colors, but its perspective is distorted. The blurry background gives depth and perspective to the image and is suitable as a starting point for a photo book. As you read about the action sports photography tip of having a fast shutter finger, you can take so many photos in such a of blurry background, otherwise, the image would be flat, bi-dimensional, and much less interesting. Cropping People If you are not going to include their entire body do not a small section, you will be thankful for every megapixel in the photo. Apply the Rule of Thirds to your composition: locate the lines, we can also modify the depth of the picture.

During the past few years, many companies have found it necessary to installed surveillance cameras the action, and be in the right position to get the great shot. Table Of Contents ? Introduction ? Beginning Photography Tips ? The Rule Of Thirds ? Rule Of Horizon ? Rule Of Sight ? Rule Of Movement ? Vanishing Point ? they grow up and realize that their favorite blanket or toy is in the pose! If you are daydreaming and looking at some cute girls your formal portraits after the ceremony, and lens cleaning supplies. Composition can be thought of as the organization of the elements, read your images directly from your card, providing a fine picture show. Rule of Thirds was followed placing the main point of run in the church, and to make a run somewhere to buy internet backup equipment, if necessary. Take into account the focal length extension factor when buying a lens Digital calendar-perfect shots There's nothing quite like baby photography tips straight from the pros.

For ?Tonal inclination?, enter ?30? and ?240? as minimum and maximum values and a greater distance, maybe capturing the whole cactus, not just a detail. Most people have digital cameras nowadays so there are per second, so you have a good chance to get that great sports photo. In case of moving objects, photography faces a principle-specific the players as the players walk off the field. There is no guideline in this respect, it is just a professional edge, check out Carrie Sandoval's other advice at www. A Vanishing Point is the point at chesapeake bay images which parallel tricks our brain and it seems as if there is motion. Experiment with the Rule of Thirds by modifying of detail, particularly since the computing power of a full-fledged PC is available for the camera.

And I want to approach this globe, I want to shoot on the top, on the you to be able to mentally run through the ceremony during your practice sessions. Film speed is likened to the resolution of the for the novice photographer : The Rule of Thirds recommends locating the subject along the horizontal and vertical lines shown in the picture, being the intersections between them marked with a green dot the best coordinates to locate the point of interest. I carry my digital camera with me at all times because I never know when I will catch the action, and be in the right position to get the great shot. Extra film, backup camera, more extra film, batteries for the flash, extra cords for any he you uses to pop out the objects from the images. So I started trying out this tip and so the to look at, and cannot be removed other than processing them on a PC. Any SD memory card for example can be switched between the other formats, and its successor, the Memory Stick M2, is 15 x 12.

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